Category Archives: Research

July Income Report – My Best Month Ever

On the heels of a decline in my June numbers, I’m happy to report a turnaround, of sorts. First, the numbers:

Adsense – $107.27
Commission Junction – $100.42
Paid Advertising – $29.63
Infolinks – $.06
Grand Total – $237.38

Yes, I’m happy with the numbers, which means I’ll be getting a couple more checks than normal, but I know the Commission Junction dollars were a fluke for the month, so I can’t count on that again; at least not yet. None of that came from the new little thing I have there on the right side, my weekly sales, although I know it got some visits in the month.

I’ve made a few changes to the site from last month. I’ve added the webinar to the left, under my ebook, and I’ve talked to my partner Renee and we’re going to reduce the price from now until the end of the year. Basically, we plan on trying to do a lot of these before the end of the year, and if we can generate buzz from the first one, then it’ll all be good. We’re also in the process of creating a survey, which I’ll post here and other places, and I hope many of you take it, as we’ll be offering some kind of freebies that can be downloaded afterwards.

I’ve also temporarily removed Adsense from the site. Not because it made little money, but because, at least when I tried getting onto the site, it seemed to be hanging up a lot this month. I initially removed the Adsense plugin, thinking that was it, but it’s Google itself. Not sure why it’s picking on the blog and not my websites, but so be it. Other than that, everything else is as it was.

And there we go. It would be nice to figure out how to make at least $100 a month from CJ on a more consistent basis, but hey, we all have to start somewhere.

Grown Up’s Piggy Bank

Price – $24.99


  Copyright secured by Digiprove © 2010 Mitch Mitchell

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 0-2010 Mitch Mitchell

Reviewing Visitors

Last night I watched a short video on a site called Inside Adsense. The title of the article was Speeding Up: The Basics And Analytics, which was kind of a goofy title because, if you ask me, the video had nothing to do with the title.

Anyway, in the video, which is about 4 minutes, the presenter talks about ways to check the type of traffic you’re getting based on looking at a few specific areas. One of those, the one I’m going to talk about here, is Visitor Loyalty. This basically states how often someone decides to come back to your website, or in this case, to my blog. It doesn’t tell how it knows who they are, and it doesn’t tell you who they are, but it knows.

I decided to look at some statistics, and of course I wanted to share with all of you. I’ve also looked at visitors before, but never at this stat, I don’t believe. I’m also doing two different time periods, one current, and one from last November, when this blog was humming.

For now, I’m choosing June 1st to June 30th. First I look at just general visitors information. During this period, I had 1,301 visitors, 883 absolute unique visitors, which means never been here before. People stayed an average of 2 minutes and 18 seconds, which means enough actually stayed around to read what I had to say. And it said I had 64% of absolutely new visitors. That percentage different from the number of visitors and absolute unique visitors, which comes in around 68%, and my thought is that the 64% represents people who have never been here before, whereas the other group has been here before, but hadn’t been by in a very long time.

Next I looked at Visitor Loyalty. It starts with that figure of 64% of new visitors, which are also one and done; thanks for coming, sorry you had to leave so soon. The rest of the figures are intriguing, though. They’ll tell you how many people came twice, three times, up to 8 times, then you get divisions such as 9-14 times, 15-25 times, 26-50 times, 51-100 times, 101-200 times, and finally 201+ times. All of these comprise my remaining 36%. My highest is people who’ve come back more than 200 times, at 11.61%; wow! There’s true loyalty, I must say. Next is twice at 6.15%, followed by 101-200 times at 3.77%, and 9-14 times at 3.54%. That’s a total of 326 visitors.

One other interesting statistic is looking at what they term Visitor Recency. This shows the percentages of how quickly visitors come to see your content. My figure is at 88% within 24 hours of posting; nice! I’m wondering if a lot of that is the Twitter factor or the subscriber factor, since all my posts show up on Twitter immediately, and of course if one subscribes to a feed they’ll know about it pretty quickly also.

Now to compare this period to November. In that month I had 1,602 visitors, 867 of them absolute unique visitors. They stayed on the site an average of 5 minutes and 59 seconds; nice. And my absolutely new visitors was around 52%.

More comparing, out of that 52%, my highest group of people coming back to the blog was from 101-200 at 12%, 2 times at 7.7%, 51-100 times at 7%, and 15-25 at 3.9%, totaling 491 visitors. And, the final statistic, my Visitor Recency figure was 92.5% within 24 hours.

This points out some interesting things. One, some of my readers have stuck with me through a lot, and I thank you for it. There’s also a lot of new readers who visit, which is great, but I’m not capturing all of their attention since their bouncing quicker than in the past. Probably many new people who visit this blog take a look at one other post, since that’s the second highest number, and then decide it’s not for them; gotta keep ’em coming. What’s a great figure for visitor loyalty? I’m not really sure, but I’m not necessarily mad at either of the figures I have.

One final thing to throw in here, since I’m talking about visitors. Out of my top 10 visited articles in the month, only 4 of 19 were written in June. My fouth highest was written last November, third highest written in January. That’s probably not a bad thing, having older posts that still bring visitors to the blog.

So, there you go. More information you probably didn’t need, but information that, if you’re on Analytics, you might think about looking at to figure out something about your visitors.

Visitors Guest Chair, Air Grid Back with Leather Seat

Price – $159.99






June Statistics; The More Things Stay The Same

Once again, time for the monthly statistics for the previous month. This month, depressing and odd; here we go:

Adsense – $86.10
Commission Junction – $.07
Google Affiliate Network – $1.00
Paid Advertising – $35.63
Total – $122.70

Last month my dollar total was $123.97, so I’m going in the wrong direction, even though Adsense went up. Not sure what happened to the little bit I was getting from some of the others, but some odd stuff has happened.

One, I think Widget Bucks dropped me. I’m not sure, but I went to sign in to check my dollars and it says it can’t recognize my email address. Hey, based on what I wasn’t making from them, it’s not all that bad, but still,… I wonder if I have forgotten an email somewhere.

Two, I dropped Link XL as one of my affiliate programs, and I’m thinking about dropping another one. I had someone contact me who had been an advertiser from LinkXL way back when, and every once in awhile I was earning something from those folks. Turns out they’d dropped advertising but forgot about it, and were having problems with their site for some reason, but knew it was coming from my site. The only way I could get the sucker to go away for good was to end my association with LinkXL. Once again, not like it was really generating anything except off these folks who were trying to get away from them.

The one I’m thinking about dropping is someone called the Gold Affiliate Program. It’s one of Shawn Casey’s things, and I’ve only gotten maybe 7 or 8 clicks in almost 4 years at this juncture. Of course, I only have the links in one place, so maybe I need to pop them on here for a couple of months to see if anyone is interested in them. They’re products about internet marketing; I’ve only purchased one of them and it wasn’t bad; pretty much all I have to say about that.

I’m also thinking about just dropping Joel Comm’s products also. Since he took the Adsense book and turned it into a freebie, trying to sell a course instead, it’s lost its overall appeal for people, and it’s doing nothing much for me.

And I’m possibly thinking about dropping TTZ Media, which are those products you see there to the right under the top talkers. According to their stats, I’ve only had two people click on them in the last six months. If that’s true or not, that’s not good at all, and I can probably use that real estate for something else, maybe the Shawn Casey things. Something new to think about.

The reason I’m thinking about dropping them is so I won’t have to check them anymore. Sure, I could just keep them around and hope to make something out of them, but their track record is horrible, and the potential income is fairly low even if someone decided they just had to start buying that stuff.

Oh, one last thing. Visits went up from May, but only by 36, though that’s from one less day than May. However, the early part of the month had more visitors when I was writing more, so I still think it depends on how much I can write. I did gain more subscribers, though, as today’s number is at 90, my highest ever. Shooting for that elusive 100; I hope it’s this month.

Anyway, another month has come and gone, and it’ll be interesting to see how things progress as I work my way through July.

Michael Jackson – A Remarkable Life

Price – $13.98








Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2010 Mitch Mitchell

May Income Statistics – Nothing Special

Time for the monthly online income statistics. As I usually like to point out, these numbers aren’t only for my blog; otherwise I might never have anything to talk about. Instead, this is for anything I’ve done online.

Here are the actual numbers:

Adsense – $80.63
Paid Ads – $40.35
Link XL – $2.50
Infolinks – $.49
Total – $123.97

Less than either of the last two months, but I’m still encouraged by that Adsense figure. Overall, it means I’ll be getting a check at the end of this month, which means I’m now averaging a check at least every two months.

Where am I at this point? Well, I don’t really know. Truthfully, I think I’m doing something wrong as it comes to my Commission Junction stuff, but if I complete one particular project that I’m presently working on that might change a little bit within the next month or so; no, I’m not giving a heads up just yet, but y’all know me, which means I’ll be talking about it at some point.

And, as you see, I still don’t have a page rank, but my paid advertising figure went up; I find that kind of interesting. What I also find interesting is that my RSS subscribers have gone up, although it does change from day to day. In May, I actually had a couple of days where it showed me as having 89 subscribers; I’m still shooting for those 500 subscribers by the end of the year. Hey, we all have to have dreams, right?

So, let’s talk about traffic while I’m at it. I said that I was going to change the frequency of my posting on this blog and that we’d see what happened with traffic. Many of you who are regular visitors said you’d like this because it would give you a better chance to keep up with the content. Well, it’s been a failure, I have to say. Here are the numbers for the last three months:

March – 1,918 visits
April – 1,486 visits
May – 1,265 visits

This tells me that when I write more, obviously I get more visitors. Not only that, but I took a look at who’s been writing comments, and it seems that most of my formerly regular visitors and contributors haven’t been coming by lately, which means that if it weren’t for the few new visitors I might not have anyone left. Thus, it’s time to increase the number of posts once again, which I can easily do. Interesting experiment, though; I really hoped it would work, but nope, the “masses” have stopped speaking.

Overall, it does seem that revenue really is impacted by traffic, or lack thereof. I’ve noticed it on my medical billing site also, as it generates most of my Adsense revenue. When people come, I have great days, but when they don’t, nada. I hope to be doing some other things with that site also, since it’s my biggest cash generator, but I’m not quite sure what just yet.

So, there are the numbers; y’all can comment as you please. Heck, I just hope some of you come back. 🙂

Zadro Products Sunlight 365 Personal Artificial Sunlight Therapy








Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2010 Mitch Mitchell

A Look At Page Views

Last time we talked about traffic and visits, and this time we’re going to take a look at page view statistics.

I tend to think of page view statistics as more important to how people feel about my content than the traffic, which is really more to help impress those who might want to advertise on my site. Page views show just what people are looking at, and how long they’re looking at it.

Doing it like last time, we’ll start with my web host statistics on page views. My hosting company, 1and1.com, only gives me two statistics on page views. One is the total number of page views I receive per day, which is a statistic that does nothing for me, and the other is the total number of visits each of my articles has received for the month. Since that’s one I can compare with Google Analytics, we’re going to start there.

One odd thing about web host statistics is that they seem to track plugin activity as a page on your site, which Analytics wouldn’t do. It’s important that I mention this up front because, per my host, my most visited page each month is my Broken Link Checker plugin, which of course no one else would see. Also in the top five are the admin panel, threaded comments, and robots.txt. So, I’m ignoring those and only going for actual articles.

A quick reminder; the words in this color, except for these two, are links to articles within my site. I remind folks of that from time to time. The navy is just for highlights.

In looking at what 1&1 believes are my most popular articles, this is what we have:

January

My Big RSS Subscriber Contest – 386
Page Rank SEO – A Short Blogging Research Project – 251
About page – 249
My Favorite Eighteen Blog Posts Of 2008 – 233

February

Why Don’t More People Comment On Blogs – 251
Top 100 Singers Of All Time – 219
My Favorite Eighteen Blog Posts Of 2008 – 203
The Ads On This Blog – 195

March

The Keys – 353
Visa Black Card – 302
About page – 294
Blogging Tips – 271

According to Google Analytics, these are my top articles for the same time periods:

January

My Big RSS Subscriber Contest – 116
Page Rank SEO – A Short Blogging Research Project – 70
How Do You Twitter – 45
December Statistics Report – Everything – 41

February

Top 100 Singers Of All Time – 85
Upgrade To WordPress 2.7.1; How – 81
Nine Best Blogs Of 2009 – My List – 54
At Least Be Professional In Your Writing – 54

March

The Keys – 140
Visa Black Card – 137
Top 100 Singers Of All Time – 110
Nine Best Blogs Of 2009 My List – 69

One thing I like is how some of my articles show up two months in a row; that always feels good, knowing you’ve touched enough people that an article has more life than some others.

Now, I’ve said page views is the most important thing to me, but the main statistic for page views has to do with length of time someone stays on the site. The longer people stay, the more you know they’re reading your article, or articles, and that means you’ve captured someone’s attention, and that they’re not only popping by, looking at a few words, leaving a comment based on a couple of lines, and moving on. At least you hope that’s not what they’re doing.

Hosting companies don’t track this, which is why it’s great having Google Analytics. For these same three months, here are top times for my articles, with at least 10 visits:

March – the average was 3 minutes and 27 seconds:

Keys To Leadership – 8:55
Is The Dream A Fraud – 7:59
Upgrade To WordPress 2.7.1; How? – 7:58

February – the average was 4 minutes and 21 seconds:

At Least Be Professional In Your Writing – 9:07
The Art Of Hype – 7:41
My Big RSS Subscriber Contest – 6:45

January – the average was 3 minutes and 2 seconds:

The Psychology Of Gambling – 9:03
SEO & Multiple Web Pages – 7:19
Page Rank SEO – A Short Blogging Research Project – 7:05

To me, for the number of visits I had each month, and the length of some of my articles, knowing that the average time people spend here means to me that people are actually reading the content, and that makes me feel pretty good, better than the traffic numbers indicate. It’s probably the people who know me and keep coming back who are the ones actually reading, but that still feels nice.

It’s also interesting to see that the articles that people stayed around the longest to read differentiate from the articles that had the most page views. Just so you know, if you’re looking at these stats, you could decide to pull together a combination of both the main article itself and the comments page, which Analytics also keeps statistics on, but I left that one alone for now.

So, that’s the two part study on traffic and page views, the two most important things for your blogs or websites. There is one last brief study, but I’m saving that one to add to my little SEO project, rain or shine. Stay tuned.
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2017 Mitch Mitchell