Category Archives: Internet

Health, Wealth, And Self Care Online And Off – Guest Post

In my post talking about my online goals for 2010, I got a quick request from one of my readers who has never written a comment as far as I know named Connie Baum. It’s always great to hear from people who enjoy what you have to say, and she asked me if I could write a guest post for her, which I did entitled Watch Out For Internet Marketing Scams. I hope you check it out.

Then I asked Connie to write a guest post for me, since her blog is all about internet marketing, so she’s created this post for us. I hope you enjoy it.


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Creating a blog post for someone whose work you admire is akin to being a child, visiting a classroom where the teacher places you at the front of the room to introduce yourself. You think you would rather be having a root canal at that moment. You are embarrassed; you are not sure what to say. You feel certain that the friend who brought you to school is biting his lip and wishing his mother hadn’t MADE him bring you.

Internet marketing is the reason I have been closely following Mitch and ‘I’m Just Sharing.’

There is something endearing about every post he makes. I aspire for my blog posts to call people to action the way Mitch’s do. When Mitch extended the invitation for Guest Bloggers, I raised my hand and ‘Teacher’ called on me. I’m looking forward to reading what other Guest Bloggers have to say, for I fancy I can learn something from every post. The trick of course, will be remembering what I learn and implementing it properly.

The mother in me is compelled to admonish all internet marketers, including Mitch, to do two things and in the proper order. Remember, kids, I’m Just Sharing. Grin

1. Take very good care of yourself
2. Take your marketing work very seriously but don’t take yourself so seriously.

Health and wealth walk hand in hand. If you lose your wealth but have your health, you can recover and resume. But if you lose your health, you also stand to lose your health as well. Doesn’t paint a very pretty picture, now, does it?

With a nod to #1 and taking good care of your body, let’s address how important- no, critical-it is to eat well and wisely; to remember to move away from the desk from time to time to move and play.

If you are fortunate to work at home where there are children-or fun loving adults, for that matter-you can schedule recess time! Go out of doors, jump rope, run, walk, turn cartwheels! Do whatever it takes to get your heart rate up and pop a sweat. Then you will be ready to go back to business and resume the creativity and discipline of work.

Your body needs water to keep all your cells functioning optimally, so keep handsome pitcher of water close by. Drop a wedge of fresh lemon in it to make it more tantalizing. And don’t be fooled into thinking that anything wet counts as water because if there is anything in the water, it isn’t really water any more. Don’t rely on coffee and other caffeine loaded beverages because those will dehydrate you and literally shrivel your brain.

Another facet of self care is to reward yourself for meeting your online goals. For example, when your new blog makes the first page of Google, you are entitled to have lunch at your favorite eatery that day. Or, you might have added 100 new names to your new list of subscribers. This calls for a hot chocolate break with your spouse or significant other! You need to figure out what floats your boat and use those things to motivate you. Some popular rewards include scalp massage, nail care, pizza, fresh flowers; new socks. You probably have your own list of what trips your trigger.

Let’s address item #2, taking your business seriously. If you are new to internet marketing, I would offer that a good coaching program would benefit you. You will learn skills you did not have previously and you will network with others who will enhance your journey.

I would also remind you of the recess idea from item #1. Being completely silly and operating with abandon for brief periods of time will increase your creativity and make you far more productive. “Do use discretion,” she warned.

Read other people’s blogs with sincere interest. Comment intelligently, adding value to their site. Interact with the bloggers; get to know them. Attend every live event you can and take copious notes whenever you are on a conference call, webinar or brainstorming session with others. Partner with others to capitalize on one another’s strengths; offer added value in any way you are able to help others.

It has been an honor to present my ideas through Mitch’s blog. Here’s hoping some value was added to your life, even if it did not shake the earth.

I thank Connie for this wonderful guest post. Here are her blogs for you to check out when you can:

Rapid Cash Review
Mother Connie Sez

 

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Is Instant Messaging Dying Out?

I remember when I first got into instant messaging. It was 1997, and I had just learned about ICQ, which is still around. There was AIM, and I don’t remember if Yahoo Messenger was around at that time. But ICQ offered just what I and my family members needed.

Through ICQ, I was able to connect my dad to all of his brothers and sisters, a couple of my cousins, and some friends I’d met through newsgroups. Later on, I had some friends I would talk to. We’d talk often, pretty much every night, and it was fun. Of course, ICQ tanked in a big way, but still, there are other instant messaging systems; even Facebook has one.

These days, I can’t find almost anyone who’s using instant messaging. It’s pretty much been replaced by Twitter and Facebook, and even a little bit by email. Sure, email was around back in ’97, but many friends wouldn’t use it for whatever reason.

Is instant messaging dying out, or am I just too old to have many friends who want to use it anymore? I ask that because it seems the people who say they still love instant messaging are all younger than 30. Obviously most of my friends are older. I only have one family member who still has an instant messaging account, and he’s rarely on. The friends I have accounts for almost never show up. There’s a couple of people I talk to sometimes during the day while they’re at work, and when I’m out of town my wife and I will try to have conversations through Yahoo (though I use Trillian), but that’s about it. I don’t even know anyone who uses Facebook’s instant messaging, though I’m sure there are people who do.

I also wonder if it’s why having Meebo on my business sites doesn’t seem to bring me much communications during the day when I hold office hours, which I announce on Twitter every once in awhile. I mean, one would think someone would take me up on the chance to speak to me live, but nope, doesn’t happen.

What are y’all thinking about this? Anyone else lamenting the demise of instant messaging, did you care, or have I just passed by the age where it makes sense for my friends and my business?

When Is The Last Time You Searched Your Name?

How many of you ever check your name on Google to see what might be out there for you? If you have a common name, the numbers might be kind of skewed, which stinks. If I go looking up Mitch Mitchell I’m out there, but I have to deal with a heck of a lot of stuff that talks about Jimi Hendrix former drummer.

However, when I go looking under my official business name, which is “T. T. Mitchell (and don’t ask, because I’m not telling what any of it stands for), I’ll find myself all over the place. As a matter of fact, out of the first 50 references on Google, 38 of the references are to me. Out of the next 50 references, 17 are about me. I mean, 55 out of the first 100; that’s not bad if you ask me.

It can be pretty heady stuff when you keep finding websites that you’re listed on, or things you’ve written. I’ve found all sorts of things about myself that I never expected to find. I found a reference to a speaking engagement I’m giving next April on social media; never knew that was online. I found that many songs I have copyrights on are listed online in a certain place; freaky. I’ve found my articles on sites I never knew existed. I’ve found myself listed for things I’d have never expected to be found for. I even found someone who recommended both my newsletters and my services (read the article by Catherine Ryan on the right), someone I hate to admit I don’t remember, or can’t verify that I’ve met, but you know, we take recommendations as we find them, right?

Overall, how many references are there that pertain to me? According to Yahoo, more than 8,600; yeow! There’s also one thing I found that kind of freaked me out. The last year of my dad’s life, he was going to try to learn HTML so he could put up a family genealogy site. He got some of the references in, but not all that many. However, one of those references is me, and seeing that, something my dad put online back in 2001,… chills!

I guess the best thing is that I didn’t find anything negative about me, which is always a good thing. Of course, I’d probably find more if I could weed myself through all those other Mitch Mitchell’s. I’m listed at least 3 times in the top 100, and I guess that will have to do. Of course, if I add the “T T” to it, in quotation marks of course, I kill! As a matter of fact, 46 of the top 50 references are me; yeah baby! How long have I been talked about by some folks online? Check this article out from January 2004. I’d forgotten about it, to tell you the truth.

I’ve talked often about marketing and advertising on this blog. I haven’t talked as much about PR, or public relations, or press releases and the like. I have talked about being all over the internet and wondering what else I need to do to break through and become at least a well known name so that I can start making money, or at least getting more business, off my own name. No one can say that I haven’t established a presence on the internet, that’s for sure.

So, how are you doing with spreading your message, and getting your notoriety online? Are you ready for more? I am.

Microsoft Store

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Hidden Messages In Email Images

What would your reaction be if you received spam email that began with something like this:

“I believe the Ku Klux Klan has been badly maligned in the history of the United States.”

What about:

“The Tyrians whom Pharaoh Necho sent down the Red Sea more than six hundred years before Christ, brought back after three years a story of their finding Africa an island,…”

Or even:

“To figure in drawing-rooms with the reflected lustre of her husband’s fame, and to find other women envious of her, was to Augustine a new harvest of pleasures; but it was the last gleam of conjugal happiness.”

I hear you now saying “I don’t receive any junk like that.” Well, I’m here to tell you that you do. Want to know how?

Any time you open up a spam email, or receive one, and it’s got a template image over it, you can bet that someone has written or posted something like that underneath it. You may never see it because the image template covers it all up, but it’s almost always there. I know this because I use Mailwasher to check my email before it gets downloaded to my computer, while it’s still sitting on the server.

Sometimes it’s amazing just how much stuff from a junk message is there. For instance, all three of these examples came with more than 2,000 word articles, though, if you ever deign to read any of them, most make no sense whatsoever.

Why do they do this? Because it makes it easier to get these messages through most spam filters, that’s why. Using a lot of text can sometimes overwhelm normal spam filters, which explains why these things sometimes get through to your inbox. Many of them look at the text, and the thing is that if they post a lot of stuff that at least, to a spam filter, looks just like a long email, it’ll go through. These people don’t care about SEO, and they’re not worried about repeating words over and over, which would trip a filter. They just want to get this stuff through to you in any way possible.

Of course, the other side of this is that sometimes this stuff brings malware and spyware to your computer also. It’s hard to hide a real virus in an image, though it’s been done, but the other stuff is pretty easy. Both of the emails my wife got contained malware scripts in them, and if she’d downloaded it, thought it was interesting and clicked on it, she’d have definitely had malware on her computer, and I’d be in there fixing the sucker right now.

I alert you to this if you’re wondering why you might keep getting this junk in your email. 🙂
 

How Goes A Webinar

As you know, yesterday I gave my webinar, and I’m just glad there were some people who signed up for it, because it would have been lonely without them. Truthfully, though, I’d have gone through with it even if people hadn’t shown up, mainly because I will be putting it up for sale at some point, once it’s cleaned up and edited a bit.

Here’s what happened overall. I called in about 30 minutes beforehand. After the Monday run through, I realized that I had to do some early setup work to make sure everything went well. This was a mix of Powerpoint and web pages, which I think is pretty neat. However, on Monday’s test, of course one of the websites went down during the test, and I knew if that happened live that it would mess me up. This time, I took no chances.

Also, you know I overcame the audio piece of things, which worked out great. All we now had to do was hook up with each other. The organizer, Renee, did some things after we connected, and I mentally prepared for it. Now we were just waiting for the magic start time.

Even without anyone calling in yet, I went ahead and started at 11:01; I wanted to start right at 11AM, as I’m kind of a stickler for time, but I didn’t have that control. I figured people would call in when they got around to it, so I went ahead and started. I got to 3 1/2 minutes when Renee suddenly piped in, saying that our first person had joined, but was having problems with the audio. What could I do? I was stunned, because you’d never have done that for one person if you had multiple people on, but Renee was worried that no one else would be able to hear either. I didn’t like it, but I understood.

So, it was about a two minute pause as she helped this lady get sound; no one else popped on during that point. When it was resolved, I started from the beginning again. It wasn’t easy; my rhythm had been broken, almost like trying to stop in the middle of urinating (yeah, I went there). Still, I do presentations for a living, so after a minute or so I got back to my normal self, and the webinar went on. People did eventually pop in, and I got some interesting questions along the way when I took breaks. Oddly enough, no one wanted to speak live, but the software had a chat feature where people could write in their questions, and Renee would read them to me during each break, since only the organizer had access to what everyone was writing.

I knew I wanted to stay under 90 minutes, yet get close. It came in at 83 minutes; not bad, considering I didn’t have a lot of questions. It was 2 minutes shorter than the full test we did Monday afternoon, but that’s okay, since we were simulating things on Monday. The thing about doing a live presentation is that you always want to make sure you have enough material so that, if no one interrupts you or asks questions, you only have maybe 10 minutes of time left, and no one will ever care if you get that close; well, unless you’re asked to do 30 minutes or less. If you practice speaking, you learn how to go faster if you need, or how to stretch out when you’re drastically short. I was just fine.

Anyway, it was a pretty good experience. I had no glitches, except for that early stoppage, and I guarantee that won’t happen again. But I do see more webinars in my future.


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