Category Archives: Internet

PC Magazine’s Gone Digital

Have you received your latest edition of PC Magazine? No? That’s because they went digital, supposedly as of February 2009. However, the last edition I got from them was in November, their December edition.

I had wondered why I hadn’t received anything, even though I had been privy to this notice, on a fluke though, from PC Magazine Editor-In_Chief Lance Ulanoff:

An Open letter to PC Magazine (Print) Readers,

The January 2009 issue (Volume 28, Issue 1) of PC Magazine will mark a monumental transition for the publication. It is the last printed edition of this venerable publication. Of course, as with any technology-related enterprise, this is not the end, but the beginning of something exciting and new.

Starting in February 2009, PC Magazine will become a 100-percent digital publication. So, in addition to our popular network of Websites, which includes our centerpiece, PCMag.com, as well as ExtremeTech, blogs like Gearlog and AppScout, and audio and video content that includes PCMag Radio, Cranky Geeks and DL.TV, we’ll offer PC Magazine Digital Edition to all of our print subscribers. The PC Magazine Digital Edition has actually been available since 2002. So for thousands of you, the benefits of this unique medium are already clear. And those benefits will continue to multiply in the coming months, as we work hard to enhance your digital experience. If you’d like to read the rest of the letter, you can check it out here.

Now, I understand the economy and how advertising is taking a heat across the board. What I don’t understand is why I had to read it online like this. In other words, where was the same customer service you used in sending me requests to subscribe twice a month, even after I was already a subscriber, in some kind of letter or notification that you were ending my mailed magazine subscription? And, by the way, where was my offer of refunding the balance of my payment, since you weren’t sending me something monthly anymore, or telling me that my subscription would roll over to the online service, which is now charging 62 cents an issue? Okay, that’s cheaper, but what about what I’ve already paid?

I also want my information coming in a magazine form. Not that I don’t look for news sometimes online, but let’s face this fact. PC Magazine, along with PC World, were two of my favorite magazines. I could take them anywhere and read them anywhere; car, plane, bathroom (yeah, like I’m the only one reading in the bathroom), bedroom, doctor’s offices, etc. I always have a copy of one of three magazines with me as just in case reading (the other magazine is Discover). You can’t take in all of the information from any of these magazines in a normal sitting, so having it available to carry around with you is a good deal. With PC Magazine being online now, there are a lot of things I’m just going to miss, and I don’t like that all that much.

Still, my main gripe isn’t about whether or not they should be an online periodical. My gripe is that they didn’t inform me, or the rest of society that’s subscribing to it, by regular mail in some fashion. I’m thinking they owe me some money for at least 5 or six months, but I’m not overly worried about that, as my rate was under $15 a year. There is a lot of information on their site; I just wish someone had said something. What do you think?


Shop Dog.com

Let’s Learn Affiliate Marketing Together

Check out my Big RSS Subscriber Contest after reading this article.

As many of you know, our buddy Yan wrote a post early in the new year called 2009 Is The Year Of Internet Marketing. As I read that article, I was thinking how, for me, last year was supposed to be my year of internet marketing, and I can’t say it turned out all that well. Sure, I made some money, probably my best year ever, and yet, when it’s all said and done, I don’t really think I learned much this year to push me to the next level.

And I’m not alone. Let’s face this fact; there’s a lot of us out here who are trying to learn this internet marketing thing better. We buy the books and manuals and CDs and videos, and, well, we probably don’t get to most of it. I know I got to just under half of it, and, oddly enough, the one thing I really worked at, that I read deeply, was Joel Comm’s Adsense Secrets, and my income did drastically increase from it, though not on the blog, but from my other sites.

This proves that sometimes this literature and stuff we decide to invest in does work. And yet, it doesn’t take care of everything, does it? Let’s take a look at this affiliate marketing thing. Last year, when I started this blog, I decided to add some affiliate banners and products to my blog. I put either a link or product at the end of every post; I didn’t make a single sale from any of that in 2008, so obviously it takes more than that. Well, I did more than that a few times; I actually wrote entire posts about some of the items I was advertising because they were things I was using and I liked, and the only one I know about that a few people actually clicked on and signed up for was Tweet My Blog, and yet I never earned a dime from them (maybe I don’t understand how they’re supposed to pay, but I know at least 3 people went ahead and downloaded the product based on my recommendation) through Clickbank; sigh,…

Enough of that. Time to stop whining, and time to start learning. Obviously I don’t know it all, but I’ve learned a bunch of things, and y’all have learned a bunch of things, but we’re still missing it. So, here’s the challenge. Let’s put together our list of questions, things we want to learn as it pertains to this thing called affiliate, or internet, marketing. I have met some big time internet gurus in the last year, and if we can put together a package of questions, I will contact one of them and ask them if they can answer our specific questions. How does that sound?

I’ll start with mine:

1. Is the list really the most important thing to making consistent sales, or any real sales?

2. With Clickbank, do we write our own squeeze page to then send someone to the squeeze page of the product, or is there a way to work around that?

3. What is the best way to sell our own products?

4. Going back to the list, is it really ethical to always gather email addresses when giving out free items, then bombarding people with sales offers?

5. How does one really go about asking for the sale, especially on a blog?

And there you go; my questions. What are yours? Or, if you can answer those above, what are those answers? Let’s all learn and grow together.


Free CD

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2011-2017 Mitch Mitchell

Google Analytics Goes Wonky

Check out my Big RSS Subscriber Contest after reading this article.

Talk about your oddities. Deciding to do a regular check of statistics on Google Analytics for this blog, I came across some of the oddest figures I’ve seen in a very long time. I don’t believe them and I’m not trusting them; let me tell you why.

According to Analytics, this blog was visited 661 times yesterday. Remember, that’s not unique views, but supposedly actual visitors. That’s just phenomenal; it blew my scale away. Except I don’t believe it; couldn’t happen.

Why? Because none of the other numbers make any sense. Supposedly, it wasn’t one article that attracted someone’s attention. Every article on the site was visited at least once. The average time per page view was only six seconds. Now, pageviews could be accurate, but it doesn’t correlate with the number of visits.

Out of those 661 visits, 652 of them came from the United States. No, that’s not necessarily uncommon. I thought that maybe it was me, sitting on one of my pages all day, but I didn’t; matter of fact, I actually shut the computer down for a couple of hours yesterday. And, when we look further, 639 of those visits came from California; I live in New York. And even more, 637 of those 639 came from the California city of,… Montara. Where the heck is Montara? My wife said “it’s probably that big dot there”; she’s a poor man’s Bugs Bunny.

So, someone from Montara could have decided to look at every page on my blog, as that’s possible, but that wouldn’t account for 637 visits, would it? I mean, can anyone see one person coming to my blog, looking up a page, then leaving and coming back? And, that person didn’t come back through the main page if they did do it, because the main page doesn’t even show 20 people coming through that way.

Part of me wondered whether it was some sort of botnet attack, but, since I don’t know much about those, it would make me wonder why none of my other sites were “blessed” with such traffic at the same time, since they’re all on the same server. I just don’t get it; strangest thing I’ve yet to see.

Does anyone else have any ideas on this? Obviously there’s nothing I can do about it, but sit here being freaked out and a little bit stunned. I guess I’ll have to keep an eye on things to see if it goes back to normal by tomorrow, but still,… Weird.

Microsoft Corporation Microsoft Office Word 2007 – Complete Package






Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2011-2017 Mitch Mitchell

Is Control A Facade?

Today I’m flying back home, after finding that, when I got back to Reno, the CFO of the hospital I was consulting for had hired another consultant to take over what I’d been doing. The odd things are that I didn’t report to him, but someone else, and that person had sent an email out last week saying he was appreciative of the good job I was doing. Anyway, as a consultant, it’s the type of thing one has to deal with, so I get to come home and reload.

Gun Control
HELEN M BUSHE via Compfight

These types of situations always lead to many questions, and one of those questions that also applies to internet marketing and affiliate marketing and our blogs and websites is just how much control we really have over all of it. It sounds strange when one considers what it is many of us are trying to do with our blogs and websites, which is to generate some kind of income, because we’re the ones who build the websites, and we’re the ones who write the content for our blogs, and we’re the ones who select the items we want to market on our blogs. It all gives us this facade of control, but just how much control do we really have?

Let’s look at affiliates first.

The main two that I belong to are Commission Junction (which I dropped in October 2016) and Google Performance Network (which went away in 2013). Overall, they’re not bad, though I’m not making nearly the income I thought I would.

Since May I have lost many affiliates because New York state decided that online affiliate companies have to collect taxes from sales made by New York state affiliate marketers. I ranted about the taxes a few days later when I lost a few more affiliates. And then last month I lost even more affiliates for the same reason, just when I thought that time period had passed. Both CJ and GPN know that I’m from New York, so you’d think they would automatically disqualify me from some programs where their advertisers have informed them that they don’t want to work with New York marketers.

That’s not the only issue with affiliates. Lately there have been a number of affiliates through Commission Junction that are changing their payout schedules, as well as changing the marketing rules for how you’re allowed to advertise for them, and you can bet that none of it is in our favor. Some other affiliate types are discontinuing signing bonuses for new marketers, citing cash issues, which to me is an incorrect tactic in a negative market because those companies that did offer it also had a goals level that one had to attain in sales before they could collect on it. Frankly, it might have made more sense to raise that level for new affiliate marketers than what they’ve done, but it’s still proof of one more thing that’s out of our control.

I also believe my December report, which Ajith had indicated wasn’t very good, shows that as much as most of us work to attain high visit numbers to help generate some sort of income for not only our blogs but our websites, sometimes it requires some extraordinary effort that, though itey might seem it’s within our control, really isn’t. My little research project showed that it’s really not all that easy to figure out just what’s going to impress visitors, search engines, and advertisers, but that still doesn’t apply to making more sales.

Does this mean we give up and let anarchy take over? Not at all. It does mean that all of us need to think more about these types of things and be ready to alter our processes for maximum effect without too much effort that brings low returns. Heck, y’all have seen my goals, and I realize that to reach these goals, and my personal financial goals, I have a lot of work to do and a lot of thought to put into it.

What do you think of my reasoning, and how would you decide to progress where your effort equals your input?
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2016-2017 Mitch Mitchell

Internet Marketing and Home Business – Guest Post

The following is another guest post. It’s an article written by Diego Norte, who writes about internet marketing, along with other aspects of doing business online.

Depending on whom you ask, the term Internet marketing can mean a variety of things. At one time, Internet marketing consisted mostly of having a website or placing banner ads on other websites. On the other end of the spectrum, there are loads of companies telling you that you can make a fortune overnight on the Internet and who try to sell you some form of “Internet marketing program“.

Today, Internet marketing is evolving into a broader mix of components a company can use as a means of increasing sales – even if your business is done completely online, partly online, or completely offline. The decision to use Internet marketing as part of a company’s overall marketing strategy is strictly up to the company of course, but as a rule, Internet marketing is becoming an increasingly important part of nearly every company’s marketing mix. For some online businesses, it is the only form of marketing being practiced.

Internet marketing is using the Internet to do one or more of the following:

1. Communicate a company’s message about itself, its products, or its services.

2. Conduct research as to the nature of existing and potential customers.

3. Sell goods, services, or advertising space over the Internet.

Components of Internet marketing may include:

1. A website, consisting of text, images and possibly audio and video elements used to convey the company’s message, to inform existing and potential customers of the features and benefits of the company’s products and/or services.

2. Email marketing, which is a method of distributing information about a product or service or for soliciting feedback from customers about a product or service through Email. Email addresses of customers and prospective customers may be collected or purchased.

3. Banner advertising, which is the placement of ads on a website for a fee. Offline this would be similar to traditional advertising in newspapers or magazines.

Of all of the components of Internet marketing, prospective customers and clients expect a business to have a website. In fact, not having one could raise a red flag to a prospect. Online usage has become so pervasive today, many prospects might easily choose to do business with a company that they can get up-to-date information on 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

Even a business that only has very local customers, such as a single location restaurant or shoe store can benefit from having a Web site. And, those businesses whose customers are not restricted to a geographical area might have a difficult time finding an alternate method of attracting customers that offers the reasonably low expense and worldwide reach of a Web presence.

Because of the “virtual” nature of most home businesses, websites, if not an absolute necessity, can certainly provide benefits to a home business operator. Since most home-based businesses don’t have a physical location, a website provides an inexpensive means for prospects to get to know what you do or what you sell and can even be a “storefront” for selling goods and services directly.

The Internet has greatly enabled home businesses to prosper because of the reasonably low cost to start and maintain a web presence. Therefore, Internet marketing should be part of your business plan and your marketing strategy.

I thank Diego for this article. I hope you enjoy it, and please visit his blog here.


Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2021 Mitch Mitchell