Black Web Friday – 4/6/12

Yes, it’s the 12th week (thanks Carl) of Black Web Friday, and I think it’s going to be another great week of highlights. Since I wrote about Dr. King on Wednesday I don’t really have a lead in this week, so let’s get right to it.

Black Web Friday

Alexis Kenne’s website is named after him (I’ll use that “E” word later probably) and he talks about making money online; I’m trying to remember if I’ve featured anyone that specifically does that yet. He accepts guest posts, so if you’re looking for an opportunity to spread your fame his might be one of the places to go. I will say that he’s more of a facilitator on his blog than a content writer, since his last original post seems to be from December, but that doesn’t negate that there’s pretty good content there from others. As a matter of fact, one I know our buddy Beverly would like was on adding press releases to your marketing; I still need to work on that one. His blog offers both the traditional WordPress way of commenting and Facebook commenting.

I mess with her from time to time, but Evelyn Parham‘s eponymously named blog (see, told you I’d use it) talks a lot about eating healthier; actually, eating like a vegan, which we all know I’m not about to do. lol She was highlighted in my very first post on black bloggers in December 2010, and gets more love because she’s got a lot of content on this subject as well as staying healthy in general. She also deviates here and there and talks about internet stuff because, probably like me, it’s intriguing, and we just can’t stop ourselves sometimes. Of course I have to say I’m still not drinking any smoothies! It’s a traditional WordPress commenting blog.

Deeone Higgs writes a blog called Releasing Me Today and it’s a blog geared towards motivation and making you feel good; man, do I need a lot of motivation and good feelings these days. He calls himself a life apprentice and spirit encourager; can’t be mad at that. There’s a lot of nice content about life lessons and moving forward, and who couldn’t use more of that these days? Once again, traditional WordPress commenting system.

Kesha Brown writes the blog Confessions Of An Uncommon Chick and in a lot of ways reminds me of me and this blog. That’s because she writes about whatever she wants to write about and does very well in that vein. You might get a post on motivation or on movies or on internet stuff or even about her; nothing wrong with that. She states that her goal in life is to be happy; I’m feeling that. She uses a cool customized theme, but it’s a traditional WordPress blog commenting system; a 4-0 sweep this week!
 

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Dr. King Would Feel Better

Today marks the 44th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. It seems that I make this almost an annual thing on both this blog and my business blog, where today I wrote on the topic of 5 Things Dr. King Wouldn’t Be Happy About. Last year on this blog I wrote on what I saw was a different take on things concerning the date and how little things have changed.

I’m slightly modifying that this year. I’m modifying it because of what’s been going on the last couple of weeks, and how it signifies, in some way, just how things have changed.

I’m talking about the Trayvon Martin case in Florida and all that’s happened because of it. Unfortunately there’s still no real resolution of what’s gone on down that way. The guy who killed him is still out of jail, and police chief has temporarily stepped aside, and the police are trying to make out like this kid was the instigator of his own demise; police will be police I’m afraid.

There’s been a major movement in this country over this case, and what’s fascinating about it is that no one has been killed over it. There hasn’t been any riots. Cities across the country have held some kind of rally in support of this kid, even here in Syracuse. It’s talked about almost every night on the news, both national and local.

Back in 1968, Martin’s story wouldn’t have made the news anywhere. No one put anything about black people on the news unless it was something major. Back in 1968, after Dr. King was killed, people went on a rampage all over the country. The police and military went on alert. For days it was scary, even for us little kids. I lived in the suburbs so I was isolated, but from what I hear things were tense in the city, though I’m not sure if there were riots or not; that had happened years earlier.

People are actually talking this time around. The conversation is about racism in general. The conversation is about guns and the rights of gun owners. The conversation is about youth culture and profiling; come on now, hoodies? The conversation is about the difference between protecting oneself and stalking and provoking someone into action so you can feel justified in killing them. The conversation is about how the police sometimes cover things up. The conversation is about a search for truth, justice, and the American way; yes, I had to work a Superman quote in there.

This is how things should happen. We should all be able to talk about things we don’t like, talk about things that scare us, talk about change, talk about difficult topics in the open. True, it’s not happening everywhere. Goodness, I’m surprised to find so many people who, when I mention it, say “Who?” Now there’s a level of oblivion I’ll never understand.

And it’s in this spirit that I write my Black Web Friday series going right now. It offers the chance for people to get to know each other and open a conversation. It offers the chance for all of us to grow together.

The first link above talks about what Dr. King might not be happy about. I think he’d be happy that for once people are talking peacefully; that’s never a bad thing.
 

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My Twitter Strategy, Courtesy Of Adrienne

By the title, if you’re in the know you know that the inspiration for this post comes courtesy of our friend Adrienne Smith, who wrote a post that I commented on last week titled My Secret Twitter Strategy. I’m not going to reveal her specific strategy, since she took the time to create this neat little video about it, but I will say that there’s a bit of automation, if you will, taking place that helps her out.

In my case, I can’t quite say I have a lot of automation, but I have a brief bit. I do use technology, but it’s certainly not automated. Also, it takes a lot more time for what are results less than what she gets, but I think the important thing is having a strategy to begin with.

My first strategy is that every single blog post I write or have, if you will, goes to Twitter automatically. I thought about the question of whether to create separate accounts for each blog and decided my mind just can’t handle being 5 or 6 different people so it all goes out under the one name. In a way that matters because everything gets mixed together and my audience might get confused. In another way that’s what this particular blog is all about anyway, so having a lot more original content going through one name works for me right now.

The next thing I do is go through the list of local people that I’ve created using an older and better version of TweetDeck to see what’s specifically going on with them. I feel it’s important enough for me to make sure I take care of my local networking to keep my presence known by them. It’s a small group of around 45 people that I stick to because they’ll talk back to me. Others who never responded to anything I had to say I removed, figuring they could care less so why waste my time on them.

The final thing I do takes some time, and I’m not sure everyone could do it or want to do it but it’s my strategy, and it works because I have a smartphone. By using the application on my phone called TweetCaster, I can literally go through hundreds, possibly thousands, of tweets if I need to. Whereas on TweetDeck I tell it to only keep the last 250 messages, I don’t tell the phone to do any such thing.

It’s a good thing I speed read, that’s for sure. If I don’t stay on top of it I can find myself two days behind the curve on checking on tweets. The program will break it into time chunks so that you don’t have to look at everything unless you want to, but that still leaves a heck of a lot of messages.

What do I do? I do through the link of everyone that I’m following, which is just under 900 people, looking at topics that I think interest me, check the links out quickly, then retweet them. Sometimes I retweet with a comment, showing that I looked at the link, while other times I’ll save the link via Evernote so I can go back and leave a comment on it later when I’m back on the big machine and still retweet it.

This strategy does two things for me. One, people love seeing their items retweeted, and they’ll often thank me for it and might pop over to this blog, or any other blog if they notice a link to a blog post I’ve recently written. Two, by going back to their blogs later on and leaving a comment, it helps introduce me to them, or remind them that I’m around, and they’ll potentially pop over to one of my blogs to say something. Either way, it helps drive traffic to my sites.

How well does it work? Well, compared to Adriene, the direct traffic I get from Twitter is around 4% referral traffic for this blog, but it’s a whopping 20% of referral traffic for my business blog. I’m thinking that’s pretty neat. Twitter seems to be her top referrer doing it her way.

Anyway, that’s my strategy; what’s yours?
 

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