How Do You Market Short Sales Products?

I’m actually putting a real question out to the masses (yup, y’all get to be the masses today) because I honestly don’t know what I could possibly do with this particular situation.

Most of you know that I’m hooked up with Commission Junction. The ads at the top and on the left side are CJ ads, and they rotate the banners each time someone stops by. And when you see products at the bottom of each post, most of them come from CJ as well.

One thing about some of the affiliate programs I participate with is that they send out regular emails talking about some of their promotions. Those that have a one month promotion are easy to deal with, because I have that sales page you see to the right with me holding the parrot that I update every couple of weeks with those types of things as they come. Those are fairly easy to handle.

The ones I’m having an issue with, and that I’m asking y’all how you’d handle them, are the advertisers that have sales that last anywhere from 24 to 72 hours only. These things come fast and furious, and sometimes the deals are pretty sweet. However, I do have other things to do, and having to go through all those emails every day, set up the code on the site, then go back and remove it during the same time period is overly cumbersome.

I had thought about popping those things onto this blog quickly, but my mind says that would degrade the quality of the blog, as who’d really want to see a post with only sales ads in it? I don’t think I’d want those things popping up in my reader all the time, even with big sales, because I doubt I’d be interested in every one of those products. I know some people might be, but I’m thinking that’s a bad way of handling things.

So, my issue is what to do with those things. Do I just ignore them and move on with my life? Do I create a blog where I can just pop those links in and go about my business? Do I try to find an hour every day to either pop new links in or remove old ones? How would you handle it?

18.5 720p LCD Monitor with Built-In DTV Tuner

16:9 Aspect Ratio 10000:1 Dynamic Contrast Ratio 1360 x 768 Native Resolution 170/160 Degrees H/V Viewing Angle 250 cd/m2 Brightness 5ms Response Time 15-pin D-sub HDMI Component DTV Tuner






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Not A Fan Of The Upsell

Last Monday I went online and ordered a product my wife and I saw on TV. We’d waited a couple of months to make sure we wanted it, then decided it was time to pull the trigger on the purchase.

A couple of days later, we started getting this phone call from a company we didn’t recognize. We had decided we weren’t going to pick it up, but after call number five I decided to go ahead and get it out of the way.

It was the company we’d bought the product from. We were being thanked for our purchase and were told that we were being sent some other nonsense that included $40 in gas coupons, and would be charged $1 for a month, which we could cancel if we didn’t want it. I decided to go ahead and let it go, even though I knew I’d be canceling the day it showed up.

The guy then sent me to someone else to confirm the order. The next guy gets on the phone, confirms what was said, then starts saying how they’re going to send me all this other stuff for a very low price, since I was a preferred customer. At that point I told the guy to not send me anything else, I wasn’t interested and would possibly forget to cancel all those things, and to only stick with the original offer. He said he understood, put me down as “no”, and said he hoped I would enjoy my purchase.

I’m not a big fan of the upsell. I understand it’s a nice little marketing trick that works on a lot of people, but at times I find it quite intrusive. What I described is how it works in the regular world, at least one way. After all, most of us have dealt with “would you like to super size that?”

Online, it works in the form of either visiting sites that offer one thing and having that popup or floating window come along and block whatever it is you were reading at the time and forcing you to take some kind of action before you can continue doing what you were doing. It doesn’t matter what it is; a product, a newsletter, subscribe to the feed… it’s an upsell to something you probably weren’t thinking about doing in the first place, or had no need to do.

One of the gripes I had with Clickbank is that it allows its users to promote upsells to the max. One product I was thinking about marketing early on, since the only association I have with Clickbank now is that book to the right side on $100 a day (I had said I was totally dropping it, then realized I liked that book and it’s through Clickbank), had it where a person might decide they wanted to look at one thing, were taken to a page showing something else, and even if you declined you were taken to a third page that had about 20 different items listed. That’s overwhelming for anyone, and I wondered if anyone would even bother with buying the first item at that point; I wouldn’t have.

GoDaddy, from whom I buy my domains from, is a master of this upsell thing. You purchase a domain name and it’ll ask if you want to buy all the other deviations of it that are available. You move on and it tries to sell you hosting, security packages, email packages, etc. Even when you get through all of that you’re offered the ability to hide your info from the masses (that shouldn’t be an option, it should happen automatically if you ask me) and many other things I can’t think of right now. I guess I need to be lucky it’s not like some other sites where stuff is pre-checked, which means if you’re not paying attention you’re going to have subscribed to something you really didn’t want.

What is your thought on the upsell? Does it make you more likely to buy or sign up for something, more likely to turn you away, or do you expect it and move on most of the time?

Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour-Season 3

Price – $32.99








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Sunday Question; Funny Father’s Day Stories

Today is Father’s Day, and though my dad is gone, and he passed away on Father’s Day 2002, I know that there are many people who have father’s that they want to honor today in the United States, and others who might be missing their fathers, yet want to glean onto a good memory of some type from the past.

I decided to ask about funny father stories on Father’s Day, but the story doesn’t have to have occurred on the holiday. Truthfully, I can’t remember many Father’s Days, which I think is a shame, though I know I gave my dad a lot of Old Spice as a kid that he never wore.

My funny story covers a bunch of years as far as distance, but I hope to tell this story quickly. Back around the time I was 9 years old, my dad had given me a new bike. We used to call them “banana bikes” because of the seats, and I was the first kid on the base to get one. One day, late in the afternoon, I was riding my bike when there was this car coming towards me. I had plenty of time, and went to jump the front of the bike onto the curb and get out of the street. Only this time I messed up, missed the jump, and I came crashing down, my chin hitting the sidewalk hard. I cried, and oddly enough it was the last time I cried until the day my dad passed away. Dad was the first one there, almost immediately in fact. He got me to the dispensary, which many bases have rather than a hospital, and they patched me up. I remember thinking how glad I was that Dad happened to be there for me on that day.

Fast forward about 28 years, 1996. I was telling this story at my parent’s house with my wife, who was then my girlfriend, and my mother and grandmother in the room as well, and just as I finished, my dad said that wasn’t how the story went. I said it was how it went because it happened to me, and he said it wasn’t how it happened because he was watching. He said he was looking at me riding the bike and feeling proud because, unbeknownst to me, he had put the bike together when he bought it. I thought it had already been assembled, but that was the model, not the same bike I got. So he was watching me when I went to jump the curb, and the wheel decided to separate from the bike and stay down; that’s why I didn’t make it. I asked why he never said anything all these years and he said he knew if he’d told my mother the truth she’d have killed him! It seems Father knows best after all!

Anyway, I hope some of you have funny father stories as well, and I hope you’re able to honor your father on this day as well.

Dad’s Family Organizer 2011 Wall Calendar

Price – $13.99






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When Things Get Personal On Blogs

This is a rant post, and I’m naming names. I’m going to try to be fair, but if I’m not, part of me doesn’t care, but the other part almost apologizes up front; almost, that is.

black-man-rant

There is a post on a blog called Growmap that’s ranting against Akismet. Okay, Akismet might not be perfect, but I’ve been a major supporter of the program for almost 4 years, and I’m not going against them now. The writer, Gail, has done some testing and supposedly she has seen that some comments end up being killed by Akismet. Not moved to the spam folder, but killed overall.

Or so she says; one never really knows if a post was accidentally deleted by someone when they emptied their spam folder or if a post was deemed as being spam by the reviewer. I know many bloggers who say they never check their spam filter; that’s not good, but it’s their blog so life is what it is. I will say that in reading other posts of Gail’s that she tends to be very thorough, as much as one can be.

Anyway, she and a few other people have gone on a crusade against Akismet, even though Gail states that she doesn’t hate it. Okay, that’s fine. I put a comment on her post saying I support Akismet and was a major fan. It wasn’t all that long a comment, and it wasn’t the first (update 6/2015; she updated the post & removed all those previous comments, including mine).

However, the response I got was way out of proportion to my original comment, and other people were skipped; to me, that was intentional and personal, and I didn’t like it one bit. And me being me, well, I don’t demure from certain things, so I commented back, trying to temper my language (I don’t curse, but I can be kind of mean spirited at times when pushed), and I think my response was okay.

Next thing I know, I receive responses on this blog from two of her supporters, one writing from a place called Linda Christas, which is supposed to be an online training organization of some sort (no, I’m not linking to them). They’re supporting Gail, which is fine, but they wrote these long comments on a post of mine that has nothing to do with the subject matter I wrote about.

In my mind, that’s spam, and I don’t appreciate it, and I went to Gail’s blog and said as much. There’s a point at which things cross the line and get truly personal, and I don’t take that kind of mess kindly, especially when the people saying stuff are trying to hide, in their own way, who they are.

One of the people, a woman named Leone, wrote with the email address of this Linda Christas. There’s this woman who either really works there or is a scam of some sort who calls herself Dr. Ann. This person has posted comments on my blog and other blogs.

At first the comments seem to match up to the content. Then they go off topic and start this rant against Akismet. It seems Linda Christas is on a crusade against Akismet, and they’re trying hard to pull other people into the process.

If you think I’m the only one who sees this and is calling it out, check out this post on TechPatio titled Comment Spam, She’s Back: Dr. Ann Voisin From Linda Christas College. And if you want to see his first post on this person and this college, which was only days earlier, check this one out as well, titled Akismet Blocking Your Blog? No Way, Just a SPAM Trick!.

Of course my respect for this college is gone, especially since I just saw a post on their site, unordinarily long, ranting against Akismet, and frankly it parrots the same type of tripe I’ve seen coming from a few other places. At least Gail did a study of some sort, which I applaud her for (see, I’m trying to be fair here).

Gail also called me out on her blog asking if she’d ever written anything that I considered as spam on this blog and I had to tell her yes, the last time she visited, which was June 2009. So, this could color her idea in some way of what spam just might be. Her last response to me, before I got mad because of the other people who came from her blog to post their “threats” about not visiting this blog again, was not in attack mode, and I appreciate that as well.

I need to say this. I have gone on attack mode on other people’s blogs, so I’m not totally innocent here. However, if I do that, I do it for one of two reasons.

One, you don’t get to go after any of my friends without a confrontation from me; that’s what loyalty is all about, and if my friends don’t breach the rules of proper decorum in another place, I’ve got their back.

Two, you don’t get to get away with racist or misogynist or any other type of hateful speech and think I’m going to let it go. Too many people decide to turn the other way and let that kind of thing go by, and that’s why we end up with some of the problems we have in this world.

Sure, I don’t expect the majority to always step in to help fight these things because it’s not in their interest; they have nothing to gain by speaking out for those who they indirectly believe are less than themselves, even if they don’t express it. So, if anyone goes to Gail’s blog and reads my initial post and thinks I attacked her in any way, please explain to me how I did it.

So, I have no respect for Linda Christas and the type of people it seems to put out; yes, that’s an attack. If people representing them believe they can come into my house and spit on my rug, it’s not happening.

I left the other comment on my previous post, even though it had nothing to do with the topic; believe me, that won’t happen again, and if someone wants to cry censorship, tough. I pay for this space, and there are comment rules; don’t follow them, don’t expect anything extra-special coming your way on my part because you feel you have the right. That mess won’t be tolerated.

If it happens on this post, it might be tolerated, since I’m in attack mode, so to speak. But we’ll see. Meanwhile, I’m going to continue using Akismet, and I don’t care who likes it or doesn’t like it. People who use Disqus or Intense Debate know I don’t like those things, and yet they continue using it. Because it’s their right to use it, just as it’s my right to use Akismet. We can debate the merits of it; no problem. But when it goes further, when it gets personal… I’ll stop there.
 

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Are Americans Stupid, Or Do We Just Not Care?

There was a strange story on CNN that analyzed President Obama’s speech to the nation on Tuesday night. However, this analysis was different than the norm. Instead of looking at the content or determining if it was effective or not, instead it concentrated on whether it was too “professorial” for most people to understand.

Once again, it’s the “dumbing down of America” conversation, and in truth there seems to be a lot of proof that it’s true in some fashion. Many of us have seen Jay Leno asking people on the street questions to things that should be obvious and heard the stupid answers that come from them. One time he interviewed recent college graduates and it was shocking to hear some of the answers they were giving.

You want to know how entrenched the idea is? Many of you know I’m a health care finance consultant. Well, one of the directives from Medicare is that any information we give to Medicare patients must be written at a 3rd grade level. That’s right, we have to try to find a way to write complicated stuff so an 8-year old can understand it. Trust me, that’s not easy to do, and hospitals get called on it all the time.

So, are we Americans dumb? Is our educational system failing us? The popular answer is “yes”. However, when you think about it, you’d have to say it’s not even close. What has happened is that people, including children, have locked onto what they believe is important to them, and on that specific thing they’re geniuses. Think back to your youth for a moment. How much do you remember from your history lessons? Then how many song lyrics do you remember from music you loved at the time?

Think about spelling. Man, do I see a lot of spelling mistakes everywhere. Even words people use all the time get spelled incorrectly. As a former employer, it used to amaze me that I’d get resumes where people would misspell the name of the school they went to; those immediately went into the trash.

Still, are we dumb? I’ll use myself as an example. I like to think I’m pretty smart. I know a lot about a lot of things. Yet, I have no concept of geography, which was highlighted again a couple of nights ago when our friend Ching Ya mentioned she lived in Malaysia, and I had absolutely no idea where it was. Then I looked it up on Google and I still wasn’t sure where it was; that’s a shame.

I also know nothing about cars except how to drive them and put gas in. I had a car years ago that I kept putting oil in, thinking it was leaking oil, only to learn that I’d been looking at something other than oil; I can’t even think of what it was at this juncture.

Why don’t I know these things? Because I don’t care. I can pay someone else to fix my car. I don’t see myself leaving the country any time soon (well, maybe a trip to the Canadian side of Niagara Falls again some day), so I have no interest in knowing where most countries are specifically, since I do have a general idea of where places are. Does this make me dumb or just uninterested? And if this is how I am, could most people be the same way?

I really don’t know; I’m just putting it out there. However, there’s a program called WebCEO that will analyze your website and give you a lot of information about it, and one time when I ran it against my main business website it said it was written at a high school level and that maybe I should change some of the language of the site. Frankly, I think telling someone that their content is too intelligent is an insult to others, and I’m not doing it.

Then again, I once wrote a song with the word “recalcitrant” in it, and my friend Scott said he wanted to hit me. I wonder if he remembers that. 🙂 Anyway, what are your thoughts on the intellect of either Americans, or the people in whatever country you live in? I’m betting we’re not alone in believing that our populations are less intelligent than in the past.

Trivial Pursuit Digital Choice

Price – $34.80


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