Tag Archives: Twitter

Why I Don’t Want To Follow Some Twitter Folks

My goodness, another Twitter post!

Yes, another Twitter post, but at least each time I write about it, I’m writing something different. In this case, I want to talk about some of the more irritating things I see on Twitter. Overall Twitter is an interesting diversion, and it’s proven to be a news breaker. For instance, Twitter users spread the news about the Hudson River plane landing at least 15 minutes before the news organizations got the story. Twitter has allowed me to talk to people, albeit in short bursts, like Guy Kawasaki and Keith Ferrazzi.

But there are some habits from people that I don’t really like. I remember having a conversation with someone one night, though I can’t remember who, on the subject of some of these bad habits. Frankly, I chalked some of it up to ignorance; ignorance of proper decorum, ignorance of what irritates people, and ignorance of new technologies and how to really use them. However, we have a mixture of things to talk about, so let’s get started.

First, there’s this new trend of people who are creating new Twitter accounts for the purpose of selling something. I’m sure that’s nothing new, but in this case what they do is create the account, then try to start following as many people as they can. They usually pop a picture of a pretty young woman in there, and I wouldn’t doubt that most of the people they’re following are men. Sometimes the names make sense, sometimes they don’t. What I do is see the email come through telling me someone new is following me on Twitter, click on the link so I can take a look, and most of the time, now that I’ve seen it so often, I know it’s a fake account and won’t follow. Usually you see something like them following 1,600 people and maybe 30 people following them.

At the same time, there are some people who legitimately do the same thing. I have no idea how they find me or anyone else, but they do, and they just start following tons of people. I also won’t add most of those folks, but if they have a link to a blog or website I’ll at least check it out first to see what I think about it all. Sometimes the person does look pretty interesting, and I’ll follow; most of the time, though, I want to wait to see if that person draws interest.

Sometimes I take a look at how often someone is updating their own Twitter messages. If they’re not doing any talking, just following lots of people, I won’t follow them; I mean, that’s a waste of time. Obviously they don’t care to share, so I leave them alone. The people who bother me the most that do something like this, though, are the people who follow you, then when you check them out you see that they have their updates protected. Sure, you could ask them if you can follow them, but didn’t I get married so I wouldn’t have to deal with having to ask women I didn’t know if they’d like to go on a date with me? Unless it’s business, I don’t give people a chance to possibly reject me, so I don’t ask, and therefore I’m not following them.

Another thing I don’t like are those folks who have automatic messages when you decide to follow them. I’m sure they think they’re being helpful, but to me it feels more like they’re trying to be pushy. If the messages just said “Thanks for following me” or something like that I wouldn’t be bothered at all. However, what happens is that they either want to tell you about their website or their product, or they want you to download something. Of course, I’m not sure whether it’s a pure download, or an attempt to get me to put my name and email address on a list so they can start sending me all sorts of stuff, but I don’t care. I don’t like it, but I don’t immediately go and unfollow them, though I should. I just don’t pay much attention, don’t download anything, and go about my business.

I also don’t follow anyone who’s barely following others. There’s something narcissisticly wrong in following 10 people when there are 20,000 following you. If the ratio looks wrong, I’m not going to follow because I know that person isn’t going to follow me. Now, if that person follows me first, then I’ll follow them, but really, when is that ever going to happen?

One last thing I hate, but ignore most of the time, is someone who keeps writing post after post, not because they’re giving us a lot of stuff, but because they want to ignore the 140 character limit and actually have a full conversation, like chat rooms or IM’s or email. Having a conversation with someone is one thing; having a conversation with yourself is another. I’ve seen quite a lot of that. I have one friend who does that very thing; once she gets going, she just goes on and on. Sometimes I jump in and start talking to her; sometimes I just ignore it and move on. Since I’ve added TweetDeck to my system to use for my “twittering”, it’s made life so simple because I get to decide who I want to follow with a custom column, so it’s easy to ignore her when I wish. But I love her just the same. 🙂

Twitter can be a lot of fun, and informative also. Some folks just don’t get it; for the rest of us, though, let’s just keep enjoying it.

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Is Social Media Hurting Your Online Business?

As all of you know by now, we had a presidential election this year. It was a major event that, for the first time that I can remember, got more social media attention than at any other time in history, mainly because of sites like Twitter and Facebook.

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Because I’m an independent consultant, I knew that I wanted to protect my overall business by not going too far in saying things one way or the other. And I did just that sort of thing until, near the day of the election, I came across this racist video of a small town in Ohio that literally set me off. Even then, I kept my anger in check by only discussing the issue that the video has brought up and nothing else; I couldn’t be faulted for confronting racism when I see it.

During the last few weeks leading up to the election, I saw some things on Twitter that really blew my mind. There were many hateful things said about both candidates, and as long as things stayed on political topics, I didn’t mind. However, when it got personal and racist and downright insulting, that’s where I drew the line. Instead of participating in the hate, for the most part, I just stopped following certain people. The thing is, some of those people were pretty big names, people whose blogs I read and who’s sites I’d visited; one of them I’d even bought a product from. But it was over; I’d lost respect, and it wasn’t coming back.

Facebook is a different animal from Twitter, and yet it’s still social media. There are people who will “friend” you, and sometimes you decide to go ahead and allow it to happen, even if you’re not sure. Most of the time it turns out to be fine, but sometimes, you see people exhibiting behavior that just drives you nuts. People put pictures of themselves on Facebook, which can be fun, but there’s certain behavior that will get people thinking of you in negative ways. I’ve heard the arguments that people should be able to do whatever they want on their own time, and that those “few” acts of indiscretion shouldn’t count against you.

Well, trust me, they do. I remember years ago going to a local networking event and meeting a woman who obviously had too much to drink, and continued drinking, even after her husband showed up. Her spitting in my face and constant touching me certainly didn’t make me a fan of her or her organization, which is one of the largest local bank chains in my area, and I knew that I would never go into her branch again; truthfully, I’ve never ended up going to any of the branches of her chain except one, and that’s only because a friend of mine works there, and I sometimes meet her for lunch.

On Facebook, it might not only be pictures. People will badger you with stupid stuff over and over, and to get away from it you finally just drop them and move on. Luckily, Facebook allows you to drop people without notifying them. Twitter is the same way, although some people have gotten around that by signing up for something, the name of which I can’t remember, but it tells people who’ve stopped following them. Why anyone would want to know when people drop them is beyond me, since there’s nothing they can do about it anyway.

It prompts me to wonder whether many people are cognizant of things they may be doing that may be hurting their business in some way. For instance, going back to Twitter, there was one lady who probably wrote at least 200 posts on Twitter a day, many times one after the other, and I finally had to drop her because it was taking away my enjoyment of the site. She’s actually quite popular, but knowing the type of person she really is has made me decide not to deal with her in any form anymore. There was someone else whose blog I used to enjoy reading, but then he decided to go after someone on Twitter over the course of a few days, and that turned me off and made me go in another direction.

As you look at your websites, and your blogs, do you think there are things there that might be turning off the wrong people? I know a few people have complained about the advertising on my blog, for instance, but this is an internet marketing blog, my intentions have always been well known as far as my intention on trying to make money with this blog, and I talk about all the things that one eventually sees on this blog, so it’s also a testing site. Yet, the majority of my visitors know what I’m doing, are interested in the same types of things, and y’all keep coming back for more (and don’t think I don’t appreciate it either; thanks folks).

But the one thing no one can say about me is that they saw me say anything inappropriate, or show or do anything inappropriate, on a social media site. I tend to be very cognizant of my image; not everyone is. Ask yourself this question today; are you hurting yourself publicly in ways you’re not intending to?


Super Bowl

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Can You Stomach Sales?

And now, controversial post number two; let’s see if this one gets to at least 1,800 words as the last one did.


from Business Pundit

Something’s been on my mind for about a month now. I’m on Twitter, and by now I have a good number of followers, and people I follow. Nothing like the thousands some people have, and I don’t go around pimping for more, so I’m content with the number I have. Anyway, one of the people I follow wrote an open message to another person I follow, and her comment was something like this: “Is the only thing you do on here is sell, sell, sell?” It was easy to tell that she wasn’t pleased one bit.

I’ve wondered why that phrase has stuck with me for so long. I’ve probably thought about it at least once a day since I read it, which is why I’m finally writing about it. Psychologists believe that if you write about something that’s been on your mind that you’ll be able to move on; or maybe it’s just Zen thoughts.

I’ve come to a realization that all of us have a level of tolerance against sales, or being sold to, at some point. Whereas those of us who are trying to make money on our blogs or websites understand that the way to make money is to find ways to drive people to our sites and blogs, most of us aren’t willing to do some of the things that others are willing to do to get those visitors.

For instance, I’m reluctant to add popups or popunders on my blog because they irritate me. I’m reluctant to send a bunch of email out to people, or capture email addresses, because I don’t like how everyone asks me for my name and email address when they’re offering something for free, or even when I actually pay for something, and suddenly Im being inundated by all sorts of email, sometimes multiple times a day, until I eventually unsubscribe. It’s the same syndrome that makes most of us cringe whenever we’re at a party or event and the person we’re talking to tells you that they sell insurance. Isn’t that a shame?

Now, the person who the initial post was directed at is one of the big time internet marketers. I’ve mentioned his name previously on my blog, but I’m not going to call him out in this post. But I will say that I’ve noticed his sales habits on Twitter, and at times they do seem obsessive. There isn’t really a balance of personal posts compared to sales posts, and yet he does have some personal posts.

But here’s the thing. He’s not on Twitter to just have fun, or tell people he’s eating PB&J sandwiches. He’s there to talk about his products, and some of the people he meets in the course of his business. Personally, I find him interesting, and when it seems like he’s hammering one product way too many times, I just ignore it because if I’ve checked once, I don’t need to check it again.

However, I also understand why he’s doing it. One, because throughout a 16 hour day, there are people who don’t go backwards who may have missed previous listings of the post, so he’s trying to make sure he’s covering as many people as possible. Two, he’s trying to make money; this is his life, after all, and Twitter is just another tool, another ends to his means. I don’t have a problem with that.

So, what does that say about the rest of us? My friends, let’s talk about this a little bit. Over the past couple of months, I’ve visited a lot of blogs, and seen a lot of ways we all advertise our stuff. We put up banner ads, paid ads, link ads, widgets, Adsense, etc. We request people to subscribe to our RSS feed, which is a different way of getting people on a mailing list of sorts, in that they’re notified whenever we make a new post, and every new post that someone reads means there’s another chance we’ll get one of those people to look at what we’re marketing, and we hope that one day someone will buy something from us; that’s fair. We see that as unobtrusive because those people have requested to be a part of our community; it makes us feel as though we’re less salesmen than providers of information; that’s slightly true, but not fully true. In essence, it means we’re not good salesmen and saleswomen. We’re non-threatening, we’re comfortable, and most of us aren’t making much at all. How’s that working for you?

Of course, some of us are kidding ourselves. I’ve read some of the comments and posts on this blog and the blogs of others, where the writer says they really don’t care whether their ads and products make much money or not, but if it does it would be nice. I’m like that to a degree, so count me in with those folks. I have a short term goal of $100 a month; I have a long term goal of at least $3,000 a month. It would make the life of being an independent consultant a lot easier. I doubt there’s anyone who says they’re not overly concerned about making money online, that’s running any kind of ads, that would say they wouldn’t be happy making at least that much money online (anyone that’s not already making it, that is).

Being an independent consultant isn’t easy; no career where you’re working for yourself is easy. You have to learn how to sell yourself, which is always harder to do than selling products. You have to go to networking events you might not want to do. You have to join organizations you might not care to join. You actually end up putting more time into your business than you did working a regular job. Sure, the rewards can be outstanding, but there’s a lot of pressure.

You have to do the sales things, as I mentioned. You have to send regular letters, mailers, post cards, or flyers. You have to send email, many times unannounced, and risk someone calling you a spammer. And, from time to time, you have to pick up the phone and make cold calls; ugh. Still, if you want to make a life of it, you have to be willing to do some of these things. Why wouldn’t I want to have that extra bit of online cash coming in on a regular basis? Then I’d get to spend more time writing these missives that hit my mind from time to time that I hope enthrall the masses?

When it comes to internet marketing, there’s tons of information for us to pick from. I mean, internet marketing is big:

So, if you’re actually serious about trying to make money online, what are you willing to do for it? Are you willing to write about yourself all the time, and post it everywhere and anywhere, at all times? Are you willing to lie about products you’ve never tried just to try to sell them? Are you willing to take chances and do things that aren’t ethical? Are you willing to buck the trends that everyone else seems to follow and look for something that sets you apart from the field? Are you willing to spend money from time to time to learn more, or to attain things you don’t presently have, but things that could possibly help you make money in the future? Are you willing to pay for traffic, or purchase Adwords? Are you willing to take a stand or position on dofollow or page rank issues that others may tell you they disagree with?

By the way, just to share this, as it pertains to this article and my last post, doing good SEO tactics on your website or within your blog may help, but it’s not always end be all/end all. For instance, do you know what the top search terms are for finding my blog? Credit cards and conference calls. Has anyone ever seen me writing about either of those things? Nope, but they’re embedded into my footer, which is encrypted so I can’t remove it. One of my Twitter friends did recommend removing the footer, which worked great on the main page, but not for all the individual pages. So, sometimes, even your best SEO activities are not good enough. However, just to put it out there, if anyone has any ideas how I can overcome my footer, I’m willing to entertain suggestions.

Just for clarification, I’m not advocating anything, just discussing the issue. Everyone has their comfort level, as I said before, but when it comes down to it, just because there’s things we don’t like doesn’t mean that we should necessarily condemn people who do it, although I’m as guilty of some of it as other people are. In the end, though, I recognize that I don’t have the right, in the long run, to complain about how anyone decides to make a living. I can do what I’ve always recommended people do who don’t like a TV program; turn the channel, or, in this case, ignore, unsubscribe, and de-list anyone who’s irritating me too much.

At the same time, I still remain open to learning more and more things. I hope you are also. I didn’t quite hit that 1,800 words; I’m betting you’re happy about that. Oh yeah; I also hope you’re ready to buy something from me from time to time also. 😀

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What Makes Twitter Interesting

Twitter is definitely an interesting place to participate in. One thing I’ve noticed is that there are really three types of people who participate on Twitter. One type is the person who just wants to talk, and talk, and talk, and they share everything from what they’re eating to what they’re thinking at that moment to a lot of other frivolous things. The second type is someone who’s constantly marketing because they’re trying to either make money or gain influence. The final type is someone who wants to try to do both, and tries to find a balance between both ends, whether they get there or not.

Right now I have close to the same number of people following me on Twitter as I’m following, around 250. I really don’t know why most people follow me, to tell you the truth. I do have some friends following me, and I know why they’re following me. There are a few people who are interested in my healthcare background, though I’ve yet to say much about it on Twitter. There are some who may want to follow my progress as I try to make it as an internet marketer. I’d love it if someone was following me because of my management and leadership experience, but I’m betting that’s being missed (as I’ve yet to have anyone sign up for any of my newsletters because they’ve seen me on Twitter, or even on this blog).

I know why I set up to follow some people, though, and why sometimes I end up dropping them. I follow friends whenever I find them. I follow anyone who seems to be trying to do internet marketing. I follow anyone who’s following me and, after checking them out, looks like they’d be interesting to follow based on previous comments. I follow some prominent people, and have actually had the opportunity to talk to some of them; what a rush that sort of thing can be.

But I’ve dropped some people who have gotten on my nerves. If someone uses a lot of bad language I usually drop them, mainly because it shows they don’t have the capacity for using proper words to get their points across. I’m not a prude, but I don’t want to see filth every other word. I drop people who just write way too many posts. That may seem odd to some because every once in awhile I’ve seen where I have 5 or 6 posts in a row, but that’s because I’m not checking Twitter every couple of minutes, so when I do check sometimes I’m going to go through 100 to 200 messages, and if someone wrote me or there’s something good to comment on, I’ll do that as well as spend some time making a comment on whatever hits my fancy. But one woman who’s considered an internet maven would post upwards of 30 posts in a row and not say anything; that kind of thing drives me nuts. I’ve also dropped some people who seem mean and overly political or religious; I don’t need that in my life either.

I’ve noticed that, every once in awhile, some people make comments against someone else that irks them to some degree. A few weeks ago someone I follow griped to someone else I follow that they’re always selling, and it irritated her. In my opinion, it would be better to just drop that person quietly, since Twitter doesn’t tell people when you drop them, than start a public spat; luckily, the guy she sent the message to never responded. By the way, him I follow because most of the things this particular guy writes are things I’m interested in. As someone who wants to get better at internet marketing, whether it’s this blog of marketing overall, I like seeing how other people market their products; at long as I’m not getting bombarded by email, that is.

How much do I care about Twitter and the like? It seems that I’ve mentioned it on 21 different blog posts, including this one, all the way from when I was griping about it, to wondering about it and whether it would survive, to talking about Twitter Grader (of which I’m presently sitting at 81; I’ll get to 100 one of these days), to showing a video with an attractive young lady talking about some Twitter tools, to now marketing a pretty good product.

This lets everyone know that I’m in it for the long haul, as far as I can see. Sure, I have my own standards for how I’ll use it and view it and deal with it, and I hope everyone else does also, as well as has some fun and learns something. And, once again, if you ever want to follow me, click here.

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