Tag Archives: Social Media

Creative Content Marketing

First, today is my 12th wedding anniversary, so I give my wife a shout out for that, even though she never reads this blog. Oh well,…

Second, I came across this blog post on Copyblogger via someone on Twitter. It’s called 49 Creative Ways You Can Profit From Content Marketing, and I found it interesting enough that I wanted to comment on it here. Hey, that’s one way to find ideas for blog posts, right?

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I tried to figure out how to write about this one without copying any of the things on that site, but I also didn’t want to go through 49 different points and answer each one specifically. So, I thought I’d just pick and choose which ones I thought were the most interesting to comment on; I hope you go to the post and read the entire thing for yourself afterwards, though.

Point #3 is interesting: “Write a special report or white paper that addresses a thorny problem in an interesting way.” It slightly touches on my post about writing for others in that it still means you have to come up with an idea on what to write about, and then decide if you can put together enough words to reach your objective. White papers are interesting because they have no real length that they have to be, but it seems that most of them are at least more than four pages, so you’re not just tossing a few paragraphs together and moving on with business. Still, it’s a pretty good idea if you can first figure out what’s bothering a lot of people, then solve it. If you can’t come up with lots of words, at least you have a blog post.

I’ve been thinking about point #8, “Build a membership web site that is a profitable business in and of itself, for awhile now. Mainly for my business blog, as it pertains to older newsletters I’ve written that my newer subscribers have never seen, and thus have never seen any of the previous newsletters. It’s the only real content of which I have lots of, can always add more to, including audio and video at some point.

Number 11, “Build a Facebook page (separate from your personal profile) that gives you another platform for interaction with your customers“, is something I thought about for a minute, then decided to discard. Most of those types of pages are known as “fan” pages, and they’re created by the person who wants people to be fans of theirs. Just just seems, well, narcissistic to me, so I just can’t do it. Now, if someone wants to take up the mantle and create one for me,…

Number 12, “Compile your best 100 blog posts into a physical book. It worked for Godin, and it can work for you“, is intriguing, because I’ve thought about doing this with some of my old newsletters, and if I go back through some of my blog posts on my business blog, I think they might make a nice little book, as Godin’s books are usually quite short. All about creating products, right?

How many times have Pater and I preached #23, “Your comments on other people’s blogs are content. Treat them that way. Be original, relevant and interesting?” The last time I wrote about it was just over a month ago, in my post Top Three Do’s And Don’ts.

And, of course, this one, #34. “Review everything. Books, blogs, newsletters, tools, physical products, information products“, is a cornerstone of this blog, although more geared towards internet stuff than the others.

Take a look at the other post to see which things you feel are more important than what I’ve posted here.
 

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Is Social Media Hurting Your Online Business?

As all of you know by now, we had a presidential election this year. It was a major event that, for the first time that I can remember, got more social media attention than at any other time in history, mainly because of sites like Twitter and Facebook.

Talk Nerdy To Me #2
Constantine Belias via Compfight

Because I’m an independent consultant, I knew that I wanted to protect my overall business by not going too far in saying things one way or the other. And I did just that sort of thing until, near the day of the election, I came across this racist video of a small town in Ohio that literally set me off. Even then, I kept my anger in check by only discussing the issue that the video has brought up and nothing else; I couldn’t be faulted for confronting racism when I see it.

During the last few weeks leading up to the election, I saw some things on Twitter that really blew my mind. There were many hateful things said about both candidates, and as long as things stayed on political topics, I didn’t mind. However, when it got personal and racist and downright insulting, that’s where I drew the line. Instead of participating in the hate, for the most part, I just stopped following certain people. The thing is, some of those people were pretty big names, people whose blogs I read and who’s sites I’d visited; one of them I’d even bought a product from. But it was over; I’d lost respect, and it wasn’t coming back.

Facebook is a different animal from Twitter, and yet it’s still social media. There are people who will “friend” you, and sometimes you decide to go ahead and allow it to happen, even if you’re not sure. Most of the time it turns out to be fine, but sometimes, you see people exhibiting behavior that just drives you nuts. People put pictures of themselves on Facebook, which can be fun, but there’s certain behavior that will get people thinking of you in negative ways. I’ve heard the arguments that people should be able to do whatever they want on their own time, and that those “few” acts of indiscretion shouldn’t count against you.

Well, trust me, they do. I remember years ago going to a local networking event and meeting a woman who obviously had too much to drink, and continued drinking, even after her husband showed up. Her spitting in my face and constant touching me certainly didn’t make me a fan of her or her organization, which is one of the largest local bank chains in my area, and I knew that I would never go into her branch again; truthfully, I’ve never ended up going to any of the branches of her chain except one, and that’s only because a friend of mine works there, and I sometimes meet her for lunch.

On Facebook, it might not only be pictures. People will badger you with stupid stuff over and over, and to get away from it you finally just drop them and move on. Luckily, Facebook allows you to drop people without notifying them. Twitter is the same way, although some people have gotten around that by signing up for something, the name of which I can’t remember, but it tells people who’ve stopped following them. Why anyone would want to know when people drop them is beyond me, since there’s nothing they can do about it anyway.

It prompts me to wonder whether many people are cognizant of things they may be doing that may be hurting their business in some way. For instance, going back to Twitter, there was one lady who probably wrote at least 200 posts on Twitter a day, many times one after the other, and I finally had to drop her because it was taking away my enjoyment of the site. She’s actually quite popular, but knowing the type of person she really is has made me decide not to deal with her in any form anymore. There was someone else whose blog I used to enjoy reading, but then he decided to go after someone on Twitter over the course of a few days, and that turned me off and made me go in another direction.

As you look at your websites, and your blogs, do you think there are things there that might be turning off the wrong people? I know a few people have complained about the advertising on my blog, for instance, but this is an internet marketing blog, my intentions have always been well known as far as my intention on trying to make money with this blog, and I talk about all the things that one eventually sees on this blog, so it’s also a testing site. Yet, the majority of my visitors know what I’m doing, are interested in the same types of things, and y’all keep coming back for more (and don’t think I don’t appreciate it either; thanks folks).

But the one thing no one can say about me is that they saw me say anything inappropriate, or show or do anything inappropriate, on a social media site. I tend to be very cognizant of my image; not everyone is. Ask yourself this question today; are you hurting yourself publicly in ways you’re not intending to?


Super Bowl

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What Makes Twitter Interesting

Twitter is definitely an interesting place to participate in. One thing I’ve noticed is that there are really three types of people who participate on Twitter. One type is the person who just wants to talk, and talk, and talk, and they share everything from what they’re eating to what they’re thinking at that moment to a lot of other frivolous things. The second type is someone who’s constantly marketing because they’re trying to either make money or gain influence. The final type is someone who wants to try to do both, and tries to find a balance between both ends, whether they get there or not.

Right now I have close to the same number of people following me on Twitter as I’m following, around 250. I really don’t know why most people follow me, to tell you the truth. I do have some friends following me, and I know why they’re following me. There are a few people who are interested in my healthcare background, though I’ve yet to say much about it on Twitter. There are some who may want to follow my progress as I try to make it as an internet marketer. I’d love it if someone was following me because of my management and leadership experience, but I’m betting that’s being missed (as I’ve yet to have anyone sign up for any of my newsletters because they’ve seen me on Twitter, or even on this blog).

I know why I set up to follow some people, though, and why sometimes I end up dropping them. I follow friends whenever I find them. I follow anyone who seems to be trying to do internet marketing. I follow anyone who’s following me and, after checking them out, looks like they’d be interesting to follow based on previous comments. I follow some prominent people, and have actually had the opportunity to talk to some of them; what a rush that sort of thing can be.

But I’ve dropped some people who have gotten on my nerves. If someone uses a lot of bad language I usually drop them, mainly because it shows they don’t have the capacity for using proper words to get their points across. I’m not a prude, but I don’t want to see filth every other word. I drop people who just write way too many posts. That may seem odd to some because every once in awhile I’ve seen where I have 5 or 6 posts in a row, but that’s because I’m not checking Twitter every couple of minutes, so when I do check sometimes I’m going to go through 100 to 200 messages, and if someone wrote me or there’s something good to comment on, I’ll do that as well as spend some time making a comment on whatever hits my fancy. But one woman who’s considered an internet maven would post upwards of 30 posts in a row and not say anything; that kind of thing drives me nuts. I’ve also dropped some people who seem mean and overly political or religious; I don’t need that in my life either.

I’ve noticed that, every once in awhile, some people make comments against someone else that irks them to some degree. A few weeks ago someone I follow griped to someone else I follow that they’re always selling, and it irritated her. In my opinion, it would be better to just drop that person quietly, since Twitter doesn’t tell people when you drop them, than start a public spat; luckily, the guy she sent the message to never responded. By the way, him I follow because most of the things this particular guy writes are things I’m interested in. As someone who wants to get better at internet marketing, whether it’s this blog of marketing overall, I like seeing how other people market their products; at long as I’m not getting bombarded by email, that is.

How much do I care about Twitter and the like? It seems that I’ve mentioned it on 21 different blog posts, including this one, all the way from when I was griping about it, to wondering about it and whether it would survive, to talking about Twitter Grader (of which I’m presently sitting at 81; I’ll get to 100 one of these days), to showing a video with an attractive young lady talking about some Twitter tools, to now marketing a pretty good product.

This lets everyone know that I’m in it for the long haul, as far as I can see. Sure, I have my own standards for how I’ll use it and view it and deal with it, and I hope everyone else does also, as well as has some fun and learns something. And, once again, if you ever want to follow me, click here.

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