5 Reasons Why I Probably Won’t Share A Guest Post From Your Blog

By now, many of you know I have this thing about guest posts and the people who request to leave one on my blogs. Even though I’ve had some on this blog (I think 14) over the course of 9 years (my anniversary was on the 12th; yay me!) and I accepted them for a while on my finance blog, overall I’m not a great fan of them across the board.


Why? Well, instead of just talking about it I think I’ll turn this into a list post of why I probably won’t share guest posts and, well, what might get me to share one somewhere on social media or even to link one to a blog property I own. I think that’s fair; let’s have a conversation about it.

1. Why did I come to your blog in the first place?

Why? Because I liked you, your writing and what you wrote about. That’s usually how the majority of blogs start; we create them, write all the content in our own words, hopefully add a bit of personality and engage with those people who deign to comment on them. That’s the true part of purely blogging; you as the owner creator, the rest of us as the commenters.

2. Why did you start accepting guest posts?

This one is probably twofold.

All but one of the guest posts on this blog over the years came because I asked someone to write about something they had better knowledge of than I did. These were people who were participants on the blog and whose blogs I visited as well, and I’d gotten to know them a little bit and knew that I could trust them to not only deliver something special, but to come back and respond to any comments those posts received. In this case, I did it for my readers; ain’t I magnanimous? 🙂

For my finance blog, I did it to generate traffic so that my advertising would generate income via affiliate links and banner ads. It worked really great I must say, to the extent that at one point it was one of the higher ranked financial blogs online.

This is probably why so many people start accepting guest posts, along with the fact that so many people start requesting to have a guest post that it alleviates all the pressure of your having to keep coming up with content ideas. For me, I started traveling a lot for work, so this helped a great deal.

3. Where does accepting guest posts go wrong?


This one has a lot of answers, but I’m only going to mention three of them; two under this header and the last one under a separate header.

The first issue is the quality of the posts. So many of them read horribly, to the extent that they’re really boring. Just yesterday I came across 4 blog posts talking about content marketing that pretty much said the exact same thing, and two of them were written poorly. I can’t imagine why anyone would want that type of thing on their blog as a guest post unless they’re just being lazy and don’t care about quality.

The second issue is that it’s hard to get those people to come back and respond to comments. Sure, some people are good at it, but more than half of what I see has comments without a response from the writer (although sometimes the blog owner will step in) and that’s an abomination in my eyes.

That was a major problem I had with most of the posts on my finance blog; the people who contacted me about the guest post turned out not to be the people who wrote the article, and the people who wrote the articles didn’t understand what they were writing about enough to come back and comment on it. Those few that did gave one line comment responses of thanks because that’s all they could muster; how engaging does that sound?

4. The #1 sin of allowing a lot of guest posts is…

The blog owner stops writing their own posts… which leads back to #1 on this list talking about why I was coming to your site in the first place. I mean, look at the ratio on this blog; over 1,730 articles with 14 guest posts; that’s 99.2%. On my finance blog, the ratio started out at 25% guest posts, but once I started traveling it probably fell to around 33%, as I made sure to keep writing at least one post a week while posting 2 articles from someone else.

Writing
Creative Commons License Moyan Brenn via Compfight

Frankly, that started to bother me because no one else could write in my style, and other than the editing I had to do I can’t say that I understood what everyone else was writing about at least 60% of the time. Almost none of it was either engaging or fun; at least they were educational… if anyone cared to read any of them (which rarely happened).

5. When will I share guest posts on other blogs?

I did say I do it from time to time, right? There are two instances where I’m known to do it.

The first is if I know the writer of the guest post because I’ve visited their blogs previously and know them. In those cases if I’m interested in the article I have no qualms about sharing them, and I might even comment on them because I know they comment back. That’s what I did on this post by Lisa Sicard on Ileane Smith’s blog (okay, I happen to be in it, but still… lol).

The second is if I happen to read an article on Flipboard and decide to share it. I don’t always know if the writers there are the blog owners or not until I click on the link later on to verify the post (I always send these articles to myself via email so I can track down the person’s social media profile) site, since sometimes Flipboard gives you a link back to their site rather than the original source. I also like to give credit to the writer as part of my Twitter strategy; who doesn’t love knowing that something they wrote is being shared?

Yeah, I know; some of my standards seem a bit rigid to some people. Yet, I share a lot of content and promote a lot of people every day, mostly on Twitter but occasionally on other platforms as well. There’s only so much I can consume and decide on its worthiness to share with my audience that if I didn’t set some rules for myself I’d never have any time to write or make a living. Those of you who comment and know that I’ve shared some of your articles can tell the others how fair I am. 🙂

Is this a mistake you’re making with your blog? Have you forgotten why your visitors started coming to your site in the first place? Just something to think about. 😉
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2016-2018 Mitch Mitchell

I Just “Liked” My First Tweet…

I’ve been on Twitter for about 8 years now. I’ve done a lot of reading and retweeting and sharing and had lots of conversations. I’d pretty much done everything I could imagine doing on Twitter.

That is, except “like” a tweet.

Tweet tweet!
id-iom via Compfight

I’m sure most of you remember that before it was “liking” tweets what you did was click on the star and it saved it as Favorites. In the original version, saving something to Favorites was like you were bookmarking links with the intention by Twitter that you’d go back and read them later on. I’ve never been the bookmarking type, so I never used it.

At some point it started taking on a different significance, which is why Twitter switched it over last November. Even though there was a firestorm (because most people hate change) Twitter announced after a week that based on their algorithms it was 6% more popular than Favorites; how about that?

I never used it, never even thought about it… until last week, Wednesday, when a local favorite Syracuse University former basketball player named Dwayne “Pearl” Washington passed away from a brain tumor. He was 52, and even though the entire community knew he was sick it was still a shock when it happened. He was not only a great college player and a high school legend, but he was the nicest guy you’d ever want to meet, and even I had to about the one encounter I had with him, along with hundreds of others.

There were all sorts of tributes to him on Twitter, not only from locals but from former college & NBA players and stories all over the place. I shared some of those stories on my social media sites… and then I liked a tweet. Then I liked 3 others. It’s amazing that it took this to get me to like a tweet because I didn’t even add any favorites to Twitter when Michael Jackson passed away… my favorite artist of all time; that’s saying something.

I’ve been thinking about the concept of social media sharing since last Wednesday. I’ve written about how I market on Twitter, which includes a lot of sharing of articles and posts by others. I’ve stepped up the game on that one since I wrote that post, but I’ll save that for another time.

Part of me realizes that liking a tweet is sharing with the person who posted the tweet that you enjoyed what they shared. However, I haven’t been able to figure out if anyone else sees it. I’ve looked on Twitter and Tweeten (since Tweetdeck changed) and on Tweetcaster on my other technology and have never seen in any of my other streams where someone just liked a tweet. I see when they retweet it but that’s about it.

I like sharing other people’s content, and overall I think I’m pretty good at it. More people need to think about sharing the content of others as part of their own marketing strategy, as well as sharing some of their own stuff. I see way too many people doing either one or the other but not doing both all that well. Because of that I’m going to mention the names of 3 people who are the best in the business when it comes to sharing… at least based on what I’ve noticed to this point.

First we have Donna Merrill of Donna Merrill Tribe. She’s a serial sharer of a lot of my posts, and not just on Twitter. Shew as the first person to share a post of mine on LinkedIn, which I have to admit I’d never even thought about doing. She shares my posts on all the social media sites I participate on and is always graceful in what she has to say about the posts she shares. She’s even shared posts of mine from my business blog, which most people don’t even visit. Thanks Donna!

Second on the list we have Sherman Smith of Sherman Smith’s Blog. Sherman shares my posts on Twitter, Google Plus & LinkedIn. He always offers his own opinion about a post when he shares it; that’s pretty cool so thanks to you Sherman!

Third, last but certainly not least is the share queen herself, Adrienne Smith. Adrienne shares more of my posts than anyone else alive, and she was the first person to ever share a post of mine on Facebook… which freaked me out (in a good way) because once again I’ve never thought about sharing almost any of my own posts in my general feed. If I were the type I’d bow my head to her and her sharing mastery… instead I’m thanking her here; thanks Adrienne!

Are you sharing what other people are creating? Are you doing anything so they know you’re doing it? What do you think of it as a marketing strategy, or even just as a way to show appreciation for what others are writing or creating? Let me know, and of course visit my friends above. Who knows; they might even like it somewhere. 🙂
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2016-2017 Mitch Mitchell

9 Relationships Between Blogging And Social Media

Blogging was the first social media. Some people might think it was AOL but I’m not sure AOL really counted as social media since it was more of a news and information site. In any case, blogging continues to be the biggest purveyor of social media information, even in the face of sites like Facebook and LinkedIn.

Britain Going Blog Crazy - Metro Article
Creative Commons License Annie Mole via Compfight

Why do I say that? If you look at what’s shared most of the time via links it’s one of 3 things; video, news stories of some sort, or blog posts. Huffington Post, in all its glory, is nothing more than a huge blog site; exclusive in its own way, but still mainly a mash of opinions and such.

While blogging can be considered as social media, it’s also different. The idea behind blogging overall is much different.

For instance, I post something on Facebook and I might get some likes. Most of the time, if I get a comment, it’s one line, then on to the next thing.

With blogs, one hopes to build up a community whereby there’s a nice mix of usual visitors with new visitors, with multiple intentions. Some of us just want to espouse our philosophies on things. Some of us want to make money. Most of us want to talk to people, which is why we leave comments open.

With that as a setup, let’s look at this interesting relationship between blogging and social media in the context of being separate entitles:

1. Bloggers promote their articles on social media; social media helps them gain notice.

That’s pretty much how it’s been since the old days of sites like Blogger and diary sites, where the people who promoted you were people who belonged to the same sites. Back in 2004 there were lots of people promoting their blog posts on Ryze; later it became MySpace. Take a look at your Twitter feed one day and you’ll see all sorts of posts going to some type of blog.

2. Social media feeds the bear with blog topics to write about.

I’ve written a lot of posts over the years about all the big social media sites. I got those ideas by participating on those sites. I also got ideas for certain types of topics by reading what people put up on these sites. You don’t always have to think of something on my own… thank goodness!

Pro's & Con's of Social Revolution
P T via Compfight

3. Social media gets more benefit from your blogging than you do.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but it’s true. This doesn’t mean you’re not getting anything out of it, but social media gets more. Let’s use Twitter as our example.

How many millions of blog links do you think goes through Twitter every day? How many of the people you’re connected to do you think are actually seeing your link so they’ll come to your site for a visit? How many more of those actual visitors are retweeting your post as opposed to leaving a comment on your site?

4. If you want to make any real money, you need to get people from social media to come to your blog or website.

In some ways people are missing the idea behind social media marketing. The idea isn’t to get people to like your stuff offsite; the idea is to find ways to entice people to come to your blog or your website. I’d say your affiliate link but trust me, most of those links and posts are getting ignored.

People hate being sold to blatantly. However, if you write an article about a product you like, then promote it on social media, and make it attractive enough to get people to come to your space, then you have a real opportunity to possibly make some money. Think about why we all hate those people posting links telling us they can get us thousands of Twitter or Facebook followers; it’s not only that we don’t believe them (it’s a scam by the way) but how does that help us?

5. Unless you’re already well known, famous people or people thought of highly in your industry aren’t coming to your blog unless they hear about you via social media.

I’ve had a couple of folks known fairly well online stop by here for a comment or two; it’s rare but it’s happened.

However, I’ve connected with a lot of famous people via social media… and they followed me first! lol I’ve ever had the opportunity to talk to them; that’s pretty cool.

Here’s the overall thing, at least from my perspective. I’ve never really tried to get anything from any of these people and I don’t go out of my way to show who I know and how I know them. In 13 years of being online and 10 years of blogging the only person I ever reached out to for anything was asking Guy Kawasaki to add my business blog to the leadership section of his Alltop site, and that was after I helped edit his book Reality Check (and my name’s in the book; pretty cool!).

The thing is, you can connect with someone via social media in a way you probably won’t on a blog. If you’re genuine they might even stop by your blog or possibly help promote you. Don’t ever expect it though; do your own work.

6. You benefit most from both blogging and social media by sharing.

You might benefit more from sharing things on social media but your blog can get a benefit also. If you mention and link to others on your blog you may get more people to your blog. That’s because a lot of people look at trackbacks for their stuff and sometimes if they see you’ve linked to them they’ll stop by to see what you had to say or share.

Social media allows you to easily share the content others produce. If it’s certain people better known than others it can bring you some attention. If it’s regular folks like you, then they’re more apt to stop by your blog or website to take a look… Some of that depends on…

bloggingdemotivator

7. Blog titles are important; social media is but it’s not always in your control.

Don’t even think about changing someone else’s article title to fit your own needs, even if it’s just to tell people what the article is about. For your own missives, finding creative titles will be productive because that’s what a lot of people are looking for. They’ve all been told that one way to garner trust is sharing other people’s links so they’ll do that, even if they never read what you’ve written. This leads to #8…

8. More people will read your blog posts than your links on social media, even if more people see them on social media.

Isn’t that a shame? I have way more people comment and share my stuff on Twitter and Google Plus without reading it than I get comments on the blog.

How do I know this? I have posted videos that take at least 5 minutes to watch and seen them shared in 30 seconds. I’ve checked viewer counts later in the day and the counts, if I had any views, never match how many times the link has been shared.

On Google Plus, I’ve gotten responses to a link that don’t match up with the article but might match up with the title. Every once in a while I’ll press someone on it and they’ll admit they didn’t read the article. The same happens on Twitter; although I have a couple of folks who’ll retweet my stuff because I’m on their list and they know me, many more share my links and occasionally comment on the title that never come to the blog.

However, if people come to the blog, I can tell who’s actually read the article or not. Some comments aren’t even worthy of keeping and I immediately move them to spam but that’s not the majority of what I get anymore, thank goodness.

What does this mean overall? It means the people you’re really going to reach are the people you can get to come to your blog. Sure, every once in a while you might get some attention on Facebook if you do certain things, but in general people are going to skip it unless you can bring them into your space.

9. Neither blogging or social media is going away any time soon.

As a matter of fact, I predict that both are going to continue growing in some form or another for decades unless there’s some type of world catastrophe; I hope against hope on that one.

Since both are going to be around, both individuals, bloggers and marketers still have time to figure it all out, how to work with each other, how to make each other grow, how to protect each other… well, I have big dreams I suppose.

There are some things that need to stop. Trolling needs to stop. Bullying needs to stop. Revenge sites need to stop. Honesty needs to be spoken of more. There probably needs to be more social progress. The world needs to find better ways to talk to each other rather than at each other.

I don’t have that answer; I’m probably too old and set in my ways for that one. However, when there’s the potential for discourse, I’ll probably be there. I’ll comment on the blog; then I’ll share it on social media.

How will you participate?
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2015 Mitch Mitchell

Liking Or Sharing Your Own Stuff With Others; Let’s Talk…

A couple of weeks ago the Hot Blog Tips Crew (without me these days…) did a video on the subject of what to share on Google Plus without, what Brian Hawkins of said Hot Blog Tips believes, is spamming. I thought it was a fairly interesting video, and since I’m not a part of it I’m just going to include the link to that video and tell you to check it out.

Sharing
ryancr via Compfight

One of the things he said in the video I totally disagreed with, and in thinking about that one particular thing it got me to thinking about some other things, hence I thought it was time to share some thoughts while asking y’all what you think of these same things.

There was another blog post I read a couple of months ago (from where I can’t remember) where the writer was saying that in today’s social media world sometimes you have to “like” your own submissions. He didn’t mean you have to like what you write as much as publicly affirm that you like what you write by clicking a Like button or a +1 button on those platforms that allow you to do it.

His reasoning was that often some of these items you share won’t get seen if no one ever clicks on them, even if they’ve viewed them, and he’d done a test where if he voted his own submissions upwards that they’d get more attention. He didn’t talk about YouTube so I doubt that was a part of his testing.

Frankly I think that kind of thing is dubious, yet if you create a Facebook business or fan page you actually have to like your own page to be able to access it properly, and the same goes for groups you might create. Thus, in an odd way you become the first person promoting you as an authority so that others can see what you like and potentially come by even before you invite anyone.

By the way, this isn’t the first time I’d seen such a thing. Another of my online friends had said the same thing over a year ago, but she was speculating without testing. I didn’t quite like it then and I don’t like it now, so I refuse to go that route.

However, Brian’s contention is that if someone shares something of yours on Twitter, G+ or Facebook and you give them a “like”, it means you’re suddenly spamming people because they probably have seen it already if you shared it. And, if other people share what you’ve posted and you like or acknowledge all of them, now you’re really spamming and people are going to hate you for it and possibly unsubscribe from you.

This is the concept I have a problem with, and I’m going to explain why. One of the things we all talk about is acknowledging people who share things of yours. It’s a nice thing to do and it encourages people who like what you do to share, knowing that you’ll appreciate it.

I think sharing should only be done if people have actually read the piece, which is another interesting topic of discussion because I know some people who share things from blogging sites or shared sites that they’ve never read to get rankings; that’s kind of smarmy, although if you do it you won’t see it that way. I never put my name on anything I haven’t read or looked at because I care about what I approve.

Anyway, if someone shares something of yours, how do you acknowledge it? Is there really a proper way? Maybe yes, maybe no; let’s look at it deeper.

Let’s look at Twitter. There you have two things you can do to thank people. You can retweet what they’ve shared and thank them or you can just thank them. Twitter moves fast; there’s tons of messages and still 24 hours to kill, and even if you share your blog articles 4 times it means you’ve missed 1,436 minutes where people might have missed it. Is it so bad to use the opportunity to share it again and let other people know why you’re thanking someone? Maybe if it’s been shared 20 times within an hour but if it’s shared 5 times total?

I think not.

Sharing
Creative Commons License [Duncan] via Compfight

Let’s look at Google Plus and Facebook. You have two options there as well. You can +1 the article or “like” what’s being shared by someone else or you can comment on it.

Here’s what I’ve noticed on both. If you write something on those shares, people in your sphere of influence see it, whether you “like” it or +1 it or not. For that matter if someone comments on a YouTube video of yours and has it go to Google Plus, and then you comment on their comment it shows in both places, but on G+ others who weren’t connected to the original poster are now going to see it.

This means that if you decide you want to thank someone for sharing something of yours, it’s going to go out to the masses anyway. Are you spamming, or are you being courteous? Should you ignore people who share things you’ve put out or not?

One last point here.

Normally we think of spamming as more of an automated thing. I hate that stuff, and I notice on Twitter sometimes that some things pop up every 15 minutes or so. At some point if I get sick of it I’ll just unsubscribe from that person and get on with life because I know they’re not there and don’t really care.

To do the acknowledgements however, you have to be present. Truthfully, how many times for most of us does our stuff get shared? Maybe for someone like Ileane Smith or Adrienne Smith (no relation lol) they could get 20 to 25 shares per article, but that’s across all platforms.

Are any of us really upset when we see different people sharing their things and then seeing them being thanked for the honor?

Are we really that sensitive to seeing things more than once when most of the time, because of how fast the internet and social media moves, we’ve probably missed it not only the first time but every subsequent time as well?

All of this is both my question and my opinion. Now it’s time to ask you for yours. Is the option not to ever thank people for sharing your posts and videos and whatever as opposed to thanking as many people are you can recognize? If you thank one person and ignore everyone else how to you think they’d feel? And put yourself into both of these situations; how would you feel if it’s you?

Making you think on a Monday; I’m so wrong… 😉
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2014 Mitch Mitchell