I Love Infographics But You Won’t See Any Here

As some of you may know, in recent months I’ve fussed about guest post requests and link removal requests that I’ve been getting a lot of email about lately. There’s one more email type that I’ve gotten a lot lately as well, although this isn’t quite as irksome.

Universe Zero
Creative Commons License Kevin Dooley via Compfight

People send me email for 4 of my blogs (they never send anything for my local blog) sharing a link to an infographic they’ve got, wanting me to see it and then asking me to share it with my readers. In essence, what they’re trying to do is get me to write an article and link to their site without their having to pay for it, free promotion if you will.

As sneaky as that is, truth be told I love to look at infographics. I’m not artistic by any means, and that includes having the mindset to know how to put one of these things together so that they look visually stunning. Not that all of them do but many of them do, and when I have the time I like to go take a look. However, I also write every one of these people back and tell them the same thing; I don’t put infographics on my sites so I won’t be promoting them.

Truthfully, I may have promoted one or two in my past, but nothing lately. However, I can’t conceive of every putting an infographic on my site for one main reason.

They tend to take up a lot of valuable real estate that’s called my blog writing space and, well, let’s face this fact that almost no one wants to visit a blog post that not only has a long infographic that’s sometimes hard to see, but then have to consider going through a long blog post as well. So most of the time when you see big infographics there’s little content because no one wants to look redundant.

As I said, I’m not against infographics, and it’s possible that some people might benefit from them. And if you’re lucky to know someone who can create a cool app that makes those infographics a little less cumbersome while still being seen by everyone (such as the one on post by Marcus Sheridan), that becomes a game changer and, if that became available for everyone, I might even consider changing my own policy in the future.

But for now y’all are just going to have to make due with my miasmic rambling missives of fact and opinion; I hope we’re all up for it. 🙂
 

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The Know-It-All Discussion

There was a post on the blog Search Engine Journal titled Get Rid Of Villains In Social Media Infographic that had this really large image based on an article written by another guy named Todd Helm, of the same blog, titled 8 Villains Of Social Media. It was an interesting take on the type of people who basically irritate most of us because they’re not really trying to be social, but trying to get on our nerves. What he did was identify types, then write his suggestions for how to handle these folks.

I don’t want to list all 8 types, because I think you might enjoy reading the article, and there’s some humor there as well, but I did want to take on one of the types because, oddly enough, I wrote about the type in my book on management and leadership, Embrace The Lead, which you see over there to the left.

That one type is called the know-it-all, and Helm states this:

The Know-it-all rarely comments unless it’s to disagree with or correct the content producer or another user’s comment. They’re generally great fact checkers and revel in correcting a specific fact, but would rather argue about opinions. They also love to point out grammatical errors.”

In my book, I wrote this:

…this person, unfortunately, is usually one of your worst nightmares rather than your biggest helper. If they don’t really know it all, it doesn’t stop them from telling you that they fully understand when they don’t. They’re also the first ones to try to help someone else understand how to do something, and invariably it’s incorrect because they didn’t fully understand it themselves. Of course there’s the know-it-all who really does know a large bit of it, and they want to take every opportunity to show people that they indeed know it all, to the point that they end up taking over and intimidating other employees. Know-it-all’s also are always interrupting you; they can destroy the flow of a meeting if not handled properly.”

So, we have a minor disagreements in how know-it-all’s act, because I’ve never known a know-it-all who isn’t always sharing an opinion or trying to correct someone, even if they’re wrong. As a matter of fact, I have someone in mind right now that I did a consulting assignment with, who would throw out all these “facts” that often I had to counter, and when I’d counter them he’d change up and say something like “oh, I was talking about _____, but you’re right, in that instance you’d do what you said to do.” Please! lol

Then Helm gave this thought to beating a know-it-all:

Strong (yet modest) arguments. It’s nearly impossible to change the mind of the Know-it-all. Your best bet is to respond to them with rational arguments that present a strong case in a modest tone. Let their arrogance and opinionated argument work against them making you look like the rational, impartial one to everyone else.”

That’s not bad, but as a point of comparison I wrote this:

There are a few ways to deal with this type of individual, but the best is to let them have their say, regardless of the situation; at least initially. If they’re the type that’s always wrong, your employees will see this person for what they are and recognize that they’re not as smart as they feel they are. At some point they won’t waste their time going to this person for assistance. Also, this gives you a great opportunity to correct them in a group setting in such a manner that they won’t see it as your trying to show them up, unless you intend to do that, and people will generally benefit because some of them had probably thought along the same lines themselves, but were going to stay silent.”

I actually wrote a lot more than that, but this is enough for comparison’s sake. In this case, we kind of agree on the strategy of letting them hang themselves in spouting information that’s incorrect and then telling everyone what the truth really is. Sure, they might come back for a second round, but most people are rational enough to see when a know-it-all is scrambling to save some of their self respect.

Of course, I do acknowledge that Helm and I are writing for different audiences here, since he’s writing to blogging folks and I’m writing to managers, but the concept is still the same overall. I’m not going to lie; I’d love being a know-it-all. I just know that I don’t know it all, and sometimes these days I feel like I’ve forgotten more than I used to know; scary. But the one thing I hope separates me from a true know-it-all is that, except for this blog, I don’t have the yearn to show it off all the time. Sure, there are times when I’ve gotten what my wife says is a little bit mean spirited and crushed someone who irked me, but in general I like to think that, unless it’s an egregious error, I’ll let stuff slide (of course, Sire’s going to come back and say I’m always pointing out errors on his blog, but he does it for me as well).

What are your thoughts on know-it-all’s in general? And please, make sure you check out both the infographic and Helm’s post as well.

Trivial Pursuit Bet You Know It Edition

Trivial Pursuit – Bet You Know It Edition


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