Comment Idiocy; Have You Seen This?

I’d like to share something with you, if I may. Read what’s below:

“Undeniably believe that which you said. Your favorite justification appeared to be on the net the easiest thing to be aware of. I say to you, I certainly get irked whilst individuals consider worries that they plainly don’t know about. You managed to hit the nail upon the top and also defined out the entire thing with out having side effect , folks could take a signal. Will probably be back to get a lot more. Thanks”


by Isabel Cruz

That was a comment that was left on one of my posts last week. I saw it and immediately knew it was spam. Yet I was curious because, for once, it seemed like it was creative spam. Normally I wouldn’t do this, but this time I’m doing it; I’m going to tell you the name of the person that left the comment and the link to the website, although it won’t do them much good since I’m not actually creating the link. The website link is crunchyblogger.com, and the writer was Romy@link building tips. And no, none of this gets bolded, including the comment spam.

Anyway, I was curious about the comment for some reason, and I decided I wanted to see if it showed up on any other blogs. I took a small snippet of the comment, from “justification” to “thing” and popped it into Google. And yes, it came up… 1,240,000 times since 2009! Are you kidding me? That exact phrase that many times for that many years. The rest of the paragraph is almost the exact same always also, except maybe one or two words here and there are changed.

It’s amazing that this type of comment, which is noncommittal and means absolutely nothing, has been missed by so many people. And what’s also amazing is just how many different names and domain names have used it. I found it on a blog posted from http://www.online-options-trading.org/; I found it on a blog posted by http://www.abcpromocji.pl/. I found it on a blog by http://matcombat.com/. I found it on a blog posted by http://www.increaseserp.com/. I even found it on Business Week, of all things, although they don’t allow people’s links to show so that’s in their favor.

Why do people send out spam? Because many blogs don’t check for it, and because many blogs can’t figure out it’s spam. Take a look at that bit of nonsense above. As you look at it, can you notice that it could apply to anything that anyone would ever write? It looks like it might be legitimate, which gets people to leave it there, but it’s not. There’s nothing specific in it at all; it doesn’t address anything. And it’s prevalent; so easy a caveman could have written it (someone had to say it). And it was obviously pre-written and posted by someone who must be getting paid to do it to bypass the GASP plugin; sneaks.

Folks, stay alert with your comments. If it looks weird, suspicious, or doesn’t seem to address your post, delete it. This is why a comment policy works in your favor, just in case one day it turns out to be a real person. And, of course, call out the frauds that use this stuff every once in awhile, like I did.

By the way, I did one last thing. I went to the first blog link I posted, and I posted the same exact comment there, using a fake name and a throwaway email address I have without an image. And it was accepted after moderation. Poor sap doesn’t even realize it’s the same thing someone had to have been paid to post here; how sad…

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Why You Need A Comment Policy

You know, ever since I added the GASP Anti-Spambot plugin a few weeks ago, the amount of spam this blog was getting dropped a lot. However, it hasn’t killed spam entirely. What seems to be coming now is a lot of one line messages that read like spam, and thus I treat them like spam. I figure that some of it are people who are thinking that they can just write any ol’ thing and I’ll let it pass; nope. However, I’m thinking some of it is automated to some degree; I just don’t know how they’re doing it.

I said I treated one line messages like spam; that’s from people who haven’t shown that they’re legitimate commenters on the blog yet. I have that in my comment policy, which is not only at the very top of this blog but listed right above the comment box on every single post. People who comment on blogs a lot and are going to write authentic comments definitely don’t have to worry about it, but for the others, I have no idea if they’re ever really coming back, so I don’t feel the same kind of loyalty to them.

I think it’s important to have a comment policy so people who come to your blog know what you expect. For instance, I really only have a couple of things in my comment policy. The first is that I need a legitimate name to call you. If you write a post and your name is a keyword phrase, but it’s not a bad comment, I reduce it all to the initials on the post. It looks ridiculous, but so be it. And I’ll refer to you either by those initials or by the first name in the email address if one is there. I stated the reason a long time ago in my post against fake commenter names. I don’t mind nicknames because it’s still something you may be known as.

The second is of course the one-line rule. I think that’s fair. After all, leaving a comment that says “nice post; I learned a lot” and nothing else could apply to almost anything. It doesn’t further the discussion and, well, just looks spammy, which it probably is. The big boys, who don’t moderate their comments, can play with that one; since I give dofollow links, I’ll handle it another way.

Anyway, if you expect certain things from people, you should let them know up front so there’s no surprise if you do something with their comment later on. Now that I think about it, I need to modify mine just a little bit more.

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How Some Bloggers View Commenters

Wednesday I participated in something that’s called Community Manager Chat. The moderators of the chat, which occurs on Twitter every Wednesday at 2PM Eastern Standard time with the hashtag #cmgrchat, always have a general topic, and 4 questions during the hour, and those who want to participate can and do so, while other just read what’s going on.


by Andrew Feinberg

The topic on Wednesday was blogging, which y’all know I feel I know fairly well, and thus I got to participate a lot. At one point the question came up as to whether people who wrote blogs responded to comments on those blog. I wrote that I respond to almost every comment, especially for first time visitors, and I found that wasn’t quite the norm from many people, even those whose blogs don’t get many comments at all.

Some people were fascinated that I respond to almost everything. Some people felt that most comments were just some form of “I agree”, and thus didn’t deserve responses. Are you kidding me? Who here remembers my post about feeling ignored?

Here’s my position. I believe that every person who visits the blog and leaves at least a little bit of substance deserves a response. I also believe if someone’s way off topic then it’s probably spam and it’s getting deleted; that’s why I have a comment policy. Now, there are times when I don’t respond to a post that I wrote more than 6 months ago, but that’s pretty rare. And I might not respond to a one line post from someone I know; I never leave one line comments on anyone’s blog unless we’re having a bit of a banter back and forth. Will that potentially change if any of my blogs ever got to the point where they were averaging 200 comments a day? Hey, let’s find out! lol

I expect y’all know I appreciate you, even when we disagree. Civility really does have a place in this world. You visit my crib, I’m going to offer you something. Maybe not my chocolate cake, but something. 🙂 You can always count on that. So think about it; how are you treating the people who visit your blog?

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