Not A Fan Of The Upsell

Last Monday I went online and ordered a product my wife and I saw on TV. We’d waited a couple of months to make sure we wanted it, then decided it was time to pull the trigger on the purchase.

A couple of days later, we started getting this phone call from a company we didn’t recognize. We had decided we weren’t going to pick it up, but after call number five I decided to go ahead and get it out of the way.

It was the company we’d bought the product from. We were being thanked for our purchase and were told that we were being sent some other nonsense that included $40 in gas coupons, and would be charged $1 for a month, which we could cancel if we didn’t want it. I decided to go ahead and let it go, even though I knew I’d be canceling the day it showed up.

The guy then sent me to someone else to confirm the order. The next guy gets on the phone, confirms what was said, then starts saying how they’re going to send me all this other stuff for a very low price, since I was a preferred customer. At that point I told the guy to not send me anything else, I wasn’t interested and would possibly forget to cancel all those things, and to only stick with the original offer. He said he understood, put me down as “no”, and said he hoped I would enjoy my purchase.

I’m not a big fan of the upsell. I understand it’s a nice little marketing trick that works on a lot of people, but at times I find it quite intrusive. What I described is how it works in the regular world, at least one way. After all, most of us have dealt with “would you like to super size that?”

Online, it works in the form of either visiting sites that offer one thing and having that popup or floating window come along and block whatever it is you were reading at the time and forcing you to take some kind of action before you can continue doing what you were doing. It doesn’t matter what it is; a product, a newsletter, subscribe to the feed… it’s an upsell to something you probably weren’t thinking about doing in the first place, or had no need to do.

One of the gripes I had with Clickbank is that it allows its users to promote upsells to the max. One product I was thinking about marketing early on, since the only association I have with Clickbank now is that book to the right side on $100 a day (I had said I was totally dropping it, then realized I liked that book and it’s through Clickbank), had it where a person might decide they wanted to look at one thing, were taken to a page showing something else, and even if you declined you were taken to a third page that had about 20 different items listed. That’s overwhelming for anyone, and I wondered if anyone would even bother with buying the first item at that point; I wouldn’t have.

GoDaddy, from whom I buy my domains from, is a master of this upsell thing. You purchase a domain name and it’ll ask if you want to buy all the other deviations of it that are available. You move on and it tries to sell you hosting, security packages, email packages, etc. Even when you get through all of that you’re offered the ability to hide your info from the masses (that shouldn’t be an option, it should happen automatically if you ask me) and many other things I can’t think of right now. I guess I need to be lucky it’s not like some other sites where stuff is pre-checked, which means if you’re not paying attention you’re going to have subscribed to something you really didn’t want.

What is your thought on the upsell? Does it make you more likely to buy or sign up for something, more likely to turn you away, or do you expect it and move on most of the time?

Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour-Season 3

Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour-Season 3

Price – $32.99








Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2010 Mitch Mitchell

Verify Your States Dispute Laws

Clickbank has a new contract which everyone who participates with them has to digitally agree to. I know most people don’t take the time to even look at these contracts. I’m a little better in that I do usually glance at them, looking for something to stand out that I might not like.

Anyway, I’m not going through the entire contract here, but only one small piece of it. And, since I read the entire contract and saw nothing which said I can’t repost it, this is the clause I’d like to talk about:

# Governing Law; Dispute Resolution. You agree that Idaho law will govern this Agreement, other than such laws, rules, regulations and case law that would result in the application of the laws of a jurisdiction other than the State of Idaho, and that any action, suit, proceeding, or claim arising out of or related to this Agreement must be brought exclusively in federal or state courts located in Boise, Idaho. You hereby submit to the in personam jurisdiction and venue of such courts and waive any objection based on inconvenient forum. YOU HEREBY IRREVOCABLY WAIVE ANY AND ALL RIGHT TO TRIAL BY JURY IN ANY ACTION, SUIT, PROCEEDING, CLAIM OR COUNTERCLAIM ARISING UNDER OR IN RELATION TO THIS AGREEMENT.

Dispute resolution is something that most companies would rather have than having to go to trial. They do this for two main reasons. One, costs are greatly reduced. Two, because juries tend to initially be on the side of potential victims, not companies that seem like they’re piling on the “little guy.” So, going to dispute resolution, they feel, gives them not a balance, but an edge, because they can still send as many lawyers as they wish, while the plaintiff usually won’t have the resources to mount a real challenge, nor feel they’re going to get any sympathy from the judge, which may or may not be true.

Anyway, you can see above that Clickbank uses Idaho as their base for dispute resolution. Companies usually look for a state where they feel they can get the best deals from the law. Many companies use Florida also; maybe it’s just statistics, because I know no one is saying these guys are on the take. However, they may be pro-business; I’m really not sure. However, the main point in the above clause is this one: “other than such laws, rules, regulations and case law that would result in the application of the laws of a jurisdiction other than the State of Idaho“. Why is this so important to know about?

Because some states, such as New York, don’t allow that law to apply. So, if I have a complaint against anyone, I can still file a claim against them in this state and it totally invalidates this clause in the contract. I pointed out that little piece of law a few years ago when my wife was going to sign a contract to do some part time work with this one company, and got them to alter the contract acknowledging it. I could look up the law if need be, but since I know this one, I feel pretty secure in putting it out there.

Anyway, my hope is that everyone else knows at least this portion of the law for where they live, as a “just in case” backup should something negative occur. After all, many of you reading this blog are hoping to make money off some of the products you sell, but, as you saw in my post about the one affiliate not paying me, you just never know.

Blogging Step One; What To Write About

A blog is an online journal of either personal or business ideas that people want to share with other people online. Some people write to get things off their chest. Some people write to journal their day. Some people write to give their opinion on things such as politics or religion. Some people write to show off their expertise in a particular field. And some people blog to make money; nothing wrong with that.

blog topics

Before even starting a blog, you should take some time to decide what you want to write about. Many people come up with a quick idea, think it’s cool, and decide that’s where they want to go. But if you’re going to blog a long time, or if you have a purpose other than just ranting, you shouldn’t skip this step.

At the same time you’re thinking about what you want to write about, you also have to decide if you’re going to try to make any money off it by adding things such as Google’s Adsense, Clickbank, or any other affiliate or PPC (pay per click) types of ads. It’s an important decision because it helps you to determine whether you’re looking to write a fun blog, a business blog of some type, or a personal blog. If you’re going to use a blog more as a diary and you’re hoping to make money off it, the ads that come up probably won’t help you much.

So, say you want to write a business blog, and you’re a financial counselor; I’m going to use this one because I’ve seen this topic fail a lot. Think about how much you could write on a consistent basis on just that topic if it’s your business. Think about who you might be aiming your posts at. If you’re only looking to talk to people who might use your services and you’re trying to highlight your expertise, you might find yourself starting to struggle for something new to say pretty quickly.

However, let’s say that you want to do that, and talk about financial matters in general. If you’re ready to give your opinion on the status of the stock market, the price of oil, the trading of commodities, CEO compensation, or whatever the latest bit of news is that’s out there, now you’ve given yourself a chance to succeed for a long time because every day there’s something going on that’s fodder for your commentary. Broadening the area of the topic you want to focus on is a key to longevity.

I met a guy a few weeks ago who said he wanted to write a blog, but didn’t want to give opinions because he didn’t want to lead people one way or another. Blogs are either for opinions or dissemination of news; everything else ends up as articles, white papers or tech manuals.

If you want people to consistently come to your blog, you have to not only give them information, but there has to be a level of entertainment. You have to be interesting; think about which teachers were your favorite in school. In history class, did you want a teacher who just gave you what came straight out of the book, or the teacher who would intersperse stories that helped bring situations and people to life (having fun memories of one particular history teacher right now)?

So, in review, decide what you want to write about, pick a topic that’s broad enough to give you enough to talk about for a long time, and be interesting. Oh yeah, one more thing; have fun with it, and think of it as fun, because if you think of it as work or as a necessity, you’ll crash and burn quickly. Even with business blogs, you’re allowed to be irreverent every once in awhile; I know I certainly am.
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2010-2016 Mitch Mitchell