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Spam I Don’t Understand

Posted by Mitch Mitchell on Dec 14, 2013
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I’ve written about spam around 125 times out of the almost 1,500 posts on the blog. I’ve talked about how much I hate it, ways to identify it, why it’s important to keep it off your blog and how to move more of it to go directly to your spam filter so that you don’t necessarily have to rush to your blog to remove it from going live as often as you might without putting certain things in place.


And yet, like the reason I have to wear this mask on my present consulting assignment right now (that’s another story) I don’t always understand the purpose of some of the spam. Back in the day most spam looked to be trying to sell something. Nowadays a lot of it is so nonsensical that the only thing you can believe they’re hoping to achieve is to get a link placed on your blog so that it goes back to their page. Obviously some of those folks got bad SEO advice of a different sort than the bad advice I mentioned in that post I just linked to.

What am I seeing? Let’s chronicle some of it:

1. The long, rambling post about nothing. I got a spam comment from someone calling himself “best gym supplements for muscle growth“, and other than occasionally trying to pop a link into it the spam comment was almost 100 lines of nothingness. Someone must have been told that writing a long spam comment gives it a better chance to be thought of as being legitimate; please!

2. The comment with lots of characters in it. What the heck is this type about? I got this mess: “ѕuρp&X6c;eme&X6E;ts mаy also re&X6e;еw the respira&X74;ory”. The thing is I get lots of these and I’m betting you do as well. It’s not even close to readable so why even bother? I’m of the opinion someone’s technology has gone haywire; I wonder if spammers can get their money back.

3. The short, incomplete and nonsensical spam comment. I can’t believe anyone even took the time to actually write this, so it must be some kind of randomizer: “Just file manufacture clear subject matter. What did you say? precisely I needed! I have been before browsing search engines like google the complete day for some correct clause such as this” That was it; didn’t even finish the sentence. Intelligence obviously belongs to other family members.

4. Spam that attaches itself to an image. This one is totally incomprehensible. It shows up at the blog with nowhere to go except spam because it thinks the image is the blog post. I hope the spammers didn’t spend too much money on this program because it’s a total loser, like the spammer.

5. The “good post” spam. That one’s been around forever, as well as calling you “webmaster” and asking you if you’re using a free theme. I’m always amazed when I visit a blog and I see the owner actually responding to those comments; well, at least they’re trying to be a good host. :-)

6. Spam that shows up without any links whatsoever. Why did the owner even bother sending that one out? By now most blogs probably won’t accept posts without a link because those are usually trolls and what benefit is a spammer hoping to get from something like that?

7. Copying a previous comment as one’s new comment. I have to admit this one’s creative, and it can be easily missed. I’ve missed it a couple of times, even though the Spidey senses went off thinking it looked familiar. This one was actually a legitimate comment… the first time around anyway.

The first link I put up on this post links you to many posts where I’ve talked about ways to protect your blog from some of the spam. I hope you’re using the GASP plugin and, if it’s really bad, go ahead and use Akismet, even though some people run from it like it’s a bull chasing them. We own these blog spaces, not them; don’t let them get you down or chase you away.

That’s all I have. LOL
 

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Where Do You Stand On Same Or Similarly Named Blogs?

Posted by Mitch Mitchell on Aug 16, 2013
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Almost 4 years ago I approached the subject of looking up your own name on search engines to see how you rank, if you come up, and to see what people might be saying about you. Probably every six months or so I hit Google and look up my name, in quotation marks, to see where I come up and with whom I’m competing against. I’m being killed by Jimi Hendrix’s former drummer, but otherwise I do pretty well with my name.

NYCC
Anna Fischer via Compfight

Last night I decided to try something different. I decided to see what I came across if I looked up the name of one of my blogs to see what else was out there. Luckily, there doesn’t seem to be any other blogs that I could find with the name I’m Just Sharing, so instead I decided to look up my eponymously named blog, Mitch’s Blog, my business blog on leadership & other business topics. I knew there would be some out there by that name, so it was a nice test.

The best thing is that my blog comes in #2; the worst thing is that my blog comes in #2. Come on now, #2? With over 1,100 posts and for it being live 8 years, and attached to my business website that I’ve had for 11 years, it only comes in at #2?!?!? And the other guy’s link doesn’t even have the name “Mitchell” in it? And he doesn’t write nearly as often as I do? And finally, it’s ranked lower than my site on both Alexa and Google’s page rank?

Well, I’ll let that go for the moment… I’ll try at least. lol There are lots of blogs called Mitch’s Blog it seems, so I took a look at 9 others so I could have a great round number of 10 to view. What I saw wasn’t great overall yet it’s still interesting.

Two of the blogs have a line or two, then links to either videos or sounds; that’s it. A couple other blogs are associated with universities, and don’t have a lot of posts on them. Many of them don’t have a new post for the last 3 months or more; sigh… One guy has his blog as part of an acne forum; I kid you not. One was on Tumblr; that doesn’t count, but he sketches and they weren’t bad, but he hasn’t put anything up in way over a year.

I did find one that I thought was intriguing enough to link back to. The guy’s name is Mitch Matthews, and I guess he’s a professional motivational speaker with a weekly radio show. It looks like he only writes once a month in his blog, his Alexa rank is over 13 million, and it’s attached to his business site. I actually hope you drop by and take a look and maybe find something to comment on because he seems like the kind of guy many of us might like to know.

As for this other guy… hmmm… No, I’m not going to share a link because I don’t want to help give him a bounce of any kind. Me being me, I went into his source code to check things out. What did I discover? Nothing! He has no keywords, doesn’t seem to have a specific topic he likes to stick to when he’s writing, he has few comments… In other words, he’s defying everything that convention says about SEO and writing on certain themes and having a domain name that relates to something you do… and he’s got my blog’s name and comes up higher on a Google search than me. And there’s no reason why… hmmm…

Is there a lesson here? Yes, there are a few lessons. One, if you don’t know where you stand then you can’t do anything about it so go check yourself out, even possibly just your name, and see where you stand. Two, Even if you’re not at the very top it doesn’t mean you’re not successful in some fashion. Three, you just might find something you like. And four… following conventional ideas just might not be enough to get you to #1. Now, how am I going to reconcile that one? How would you?
 

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Verifying Google Authorship

Posted by Mitch Mitchell on Feb 24, 2013
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Back in October I talked about Google authorship for the first time. If you follow that link, you’ll see an example of what it can do for you, but for those who are new to this concept, it allows for the possibility of people actually seeing your image next to a search term if it comes up during a Google search. If someone knows you it’s even better, but if not they might visit your link just because there’s a picture next to it. It can enhance your online presence greatly… isn’t that pretty cool?

What I’m finding out is that many people aren’t sure how to do it, or haven’t done it. Goodness, I knew about it, yet I figured out yesterday that I hadn’t completed it for all of my blogs; what a moron! I’d have slapped myself if I could have gotten my hands in the right position. lol

In any case, this is a quick tutorial, and the video below, with my Hot Blog Tips Hangout buddies, will talk more about it and its importance, and you can hear me giving this same advice there if you hate reading everything.

First, you have to have a Google Plus profile; without that, none of this will work. Once you have that, or if you already have that, you come back to your blog and, if you have WordPress software as your platform, you go into your User profile. I’m betting that most of you haven’t been there since you created your blogs. You’ll see what’s below, although in a totally different color:

user panel

Notice that last category saying Google+? You copy your Google profile About page link into this space. This is what G+ will be looking for when it goes to verify that it’s you. If you have multiple writers on your blog, if you enter this for each of them and they put their profile information in it’ll show them in search results as well.

After you’ve done that, go back to your Google profile and look at your About page. It looks like this:

profile01

The email address you have here has to match the email address you have on your blog associated with that blog. If you notice, since I have 5 blogs, I have 5 email addresses. What you don’t see here is the word “verify” next to each email address, since I’ve already done that. You’d click on that word and it will send an email to that address with a link in it. You’d click on that link, then come back to your profile where you’ll see this:

verified1

That’s when you know you’re good to go. It can take anywhere from a week to 3 weeks before your image finally shows up next to your content, but the first time you see it will make you happy. And, if you didn’t go back to that other post, know that during a search your image will only come upon the first post you’re found for, even if you’re showing for all the listings. I guess even Google only wants to see us just so much. ;-)

There you go; easy peasy. If you want more, watch the video below; we’re always entertaining:



http://youtu.be/lzP2zFmjL68

 

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Posting Times On Social Media?

Posted by Mitch Mitchell on Aug 29, 2012
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I’ve always been someone who has given a lot of thought into when I should have my posts show up on Twitter and on other social media platforms. I really didn’t have anything to go on so I used my own judgment.

21-06-10 Cause I'd Rather Pretend I'll Still Be There At The End ~ Explored #1
Βethan via Compfight

For the last 2 years I’ve had the posts on my blog go live between 9 and 10AM Eastern Standard time. In my way of thinking, it would be the time that most people on the East Coast, where I live, would be alert, probably already at work or have started their working day and have some energy.

Then, later in the evening or early morning, I find myself reposting my links to Twitter, often between midnight and 1AM, trying to reach a second audience that I figure is either on the West Coast or in other countries that might just be coming alert or waking up.

Anyway, these were my preconceived notions. I never had any data. Now I do, as this post on Kissmetrics titled An In-Depth Look at the Science of Twitter Timing was kind of illuminating. In essence, the person who wrote the article found some statistics that pretty much blew my mind.

The article is mainly about Twitter but in my mind if it works on Twitter it probably works on other sites as well. The main thing it stated is that 80% of the American audience on Twitter is in Eastern and Central time zones; that’s just wild! It also stated that based on user patterns, the majority of people who are apt to read and retweet posts do it between noon and 6PM, but that 5PM is the best time of all.

Talk about something that freaked my mind out. I’ve never thought about posting in the afternoon as a strategy. My mind said that’s when people were looking to go home from work and thus would be otherwise engaged. But numbers don’t lie, do they?

What to do, what to do… Well, that’s the blessing of having multiple blogs, isn’t it? Since I have 4 blogs that are the most regular, I’m going to split the times up better so I can do my own testing. I’m not sure as I write this, which is about 2 weeks in advance, of which blogs will post when. I do know that this particular blog’s feed goes out around 7PM every time I write a post, so I’ll have to take that into consideration.

What do you think of some of these stats? And if you’re in other parts of the world, do you think they’ll hold true for you as well?
 

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3 More Things To Know About In Your WordPress Admin Area

Posted by Mitch Mitchell on Feb 25, 2012
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For some of you I hear the question now: “Why only 3 more things?” Because if you’ve followed this blog for awhile, or not, you’ll remember that I had my first post in September 2010 on 5 Areas You Should Know More About In Your WordPress Admin Area, followed a month later with 5 More Things To Know About Your WordPress Admin Area and finally 4 Things You Can Do With Your WordPress Blog You Might Not Know Already. Frankly, I think I’ve shared more about the admin area than almost anyone else except WordPress.

So today I have 3 more things I’ve discovered that you might not know about or haven’t paid any attention to. I have to make sure I’m not copying myself either; let’s see what happens.

1. Did you know that when you’re addressing comments if you hover over a person’s link under their name on the left side that WordPress will bring you an image of their website or blog? That’s pretty neat and it might help you decide if you want to keep the comment or not, deciding that a site might not be one you want to help promote via CommentLuv or through the link to the side if it’s just a website.

2. Did you know that, if you’re running CommentLuv, you can remove the “luv”, if you will, while keeping the comment? I don’t do this often but there are times when I look at the link and decide “no, this thing looks dangerous”, especially in combination with the first tip I just gave you. Of course if you’re like me most of the time you might have decided the comment isn’t worth keeping either in which case just delete it all, but this is another option if the comment seems legit.

3. Did you know that you can install plugins directly from your WordPress menu instead of downloading and then uploading them? All you do is go to Plugins over there and slide down to Add New. Once there, you can type in the entire name of the plugin you want, or if you’re unsure just type in a few words and do a search, and most probably lots of choices will come up with a ranking system from 1 to 5 stars. Much easier and saves time as well.

That’s it. What, you wanted more? Maybe next time! lol
 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2012 Mitch Mitchell